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Difference between modern wrist shot and classic wrist shot?

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07-22-2011, 12:10 PM
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Rebels21
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Difference between modern wrist shot and classic wrist shot?

I overheard some guys at the rink and they were talking about how they are teaching their kids the modern wrist shot before the classic and didnt know what they meant by modern and classical shot. So what are the shots. I only know of a few( maybe like 4) ways to take a wrist shot and they depend on which foot i shoot off of. Thanks

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07-22-2011, 12:32 PM
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rwr
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maybe they are talking about just teaching the kid the basics of a wrist shot, rather than trying to teach them to try and load the flex of the stick like the pro's


your thinking of a wrist shop that you get off really quickly, not as hard, and the more powerfull wrist shot that goalies have more time to react to

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07-22-2011, 12:36 PM
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SERE 24
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Yeah, there is no such distinction. Just a couple of guys talking, making up terms to express their meaning. I would imagine they meant the quick, wrist snap to be the modern wrister and the more sweeping wrist shot to be the classic. Personally, the broader sweeping motion is useless unless you're wide open and have a great lane to burn one on net. Otherwise, the quicker snap without any real telegraphing is the way to go.

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07-22-2011, 12:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwr View Post
maybe they are talking about just teaching the kid the basics of a wrist shot, rather than trying to teach them to try and load the flex of the stick like the pro's


your thinking of a wrist shop that you get off really quickly, not as hard, and the more powerfull wrist shot that goalies have more time to react to
Exactly. i know those 2 wrist shots and different ways to release them off but haven't ever heard the term modern wrist shot.

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07-22-2011, 01:00 PM
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ponder
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When people talk about a classic wrist shot, they're referring to how wrist shots used to be taken, with wood sticks, where you'd really draw the puck back and then sweep it forward, rolling the wrists at the end, but with the puck constantly in contact with the blade.

Classic snap shots were simply slap shots with very small windups, sometimes without the blade ever leaving the ice, but essentially any sort of shot where you'd flex the stick behind the puck, before it come into contact with the puck, but not slap shots, which have bigger wind ups.

Today, most people take shots that are essentially a hybrid of classic wrist shots and classic snap shots. These "modern wrist shots," or wrist/snap hybrids, became essentially the only type of wrist or snap shot used once composite sticks got popular, but were around even before that. It's where you pull the puck a little in and forward, let it get slightly ahead of your stick, then really focus on snapping the stick and shooting using the flex of the shaft for power, all in one smooth motion. Not quite a classic wrist shot or a classic snap shot, but a sort of combo of both, sometimes people just call these simply wrist shots OR snap shots (confusing, they used to be very different but have now come to mean the same thing), sometimes "modern wrist shots" or "modern snap shots", but it's basically how all good players shoot nowadays for all non-slap shots. You can take them off the inside or the outside foot. The mini-wind-up slap shots, that used to be called snap shots, are now just considered slap shots.

Modern wrsit shot/modern snap shot (same thing basically):


Last edited by ponder: 07-22-2011 at 01:12 PM.
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07-22-2011, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prustqvist24 View Post
Yeah, there is no such distinction. Just a couple of guys talking, making up terms to express their meaning. I would imagine they meant the quick, wrist snap to be the modern wrister and the more sweeping wrist shot to be the classic. Personally, the broader sweeping motion is useless unless you're wide open and have a great lane to burn one on net. Otherwise, the quicker snap without any real telegraphing is the way to go.
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Originally Posted by ponder View Post
When people talk about a classic wrist shot, they're referring to how wrist shots used to be taken, with wood sticks, where you'd really draw the puck back and then sweep it forward, rolling the wrists at the end, but with the puck constantly in contact with the blade.

Classic snap shots were simply slap shots with very small windups, sometimes without the blade ever leaving the ice, but essentially any sort of shot where you'd flex the stick behind the puck, before it come into contact with the puck, but not slap shots, which have bigger wind ups.

Today, most people take shots that are essentially a hybrid of classic wrist shots and classic snap shots. These "modern wrist shots," or wrist/snap hybrids, became essentially the only type of wrist or snap shot used once composite sticks got popular, but were around even before that. It's where you pull the puck a little in and forward, let it get slightly ahead of your stick, then really focus on snapping the stick and shooting using the flex of the shaft for power, all in one smooth motion. Not quite a classic wrist shot or a classic snap shot, but a sort of combo of both, sometimes people just call these simply wrist shots OR snap shots (confusing, they used to be very different but have now come to mean the same thing), sometimes "modern wrist shots" or "modern snap shots", but it's basically how all good players shoot nowadays for all non-slap shots. You can take them off the inside or the outside foot. The mini-wind-up slap shots, that used to be called snap shots, are now just considered slap shots.

Modern wrsit shot/modern snap shot (same thing basically):

Thank you for articulating what I was trying to say in much clearer, more specific terms. This is what I meant.

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07-22-2011, 02:25 PM
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My definitions:

Pure wrist shot is drawing the puck behind the body and sweeping it forward towards the target. At the point of release, the top hand pulls back and the bottom hand pushes forward while the forearms are used to open up the blade and then quickly flick it closed. The power is generated by your forward momentum combined with the sweeping motion and blade spinning the puck, a lot like a frisbee. Technically this can be done with a stick that literally does not flex, a lot like the old wood sticks.

Pure snap shot is transferring the forward momentum and upper body strength into the shaft of the stick, then quickly pulling back on the top hand while pushing through with the bottom hand to launch the puck. The power is generated by storing the energy in the stick and releasing it all at once, like shooting an arrow with a bow. This requires a stick that can be flexed, which is why this shot became so much more popular recently with composite sticks.

Today the wrist shot and snap shot have become a gray area as most players will have a hybrid of the two. They're getting more power on their shots with a quicker release, at the expense of some accuracy.

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07-23-2011, 11:25 AM
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Sharpshooter101
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Well, if you take a guy like Sasha Semin, you get probably the most powerful wrist shot in hockey history... it's almost a slap shot taken from in-close without the wind-up time and that's about it. I've barely ever seen NHL goaltenders choosing the wrong side from a 35 foot wrist shot they clearly see, but I did saw many of them doing so when Semin shoots - just to give you an idea.

He doesn't actually hit snap shots when he shoots all that often; what you'll see him doing times and times again is an off-foot wrist shot (if you've seen him play, you also seen him times and times again, standing on his right leg and kicking the other one - that's an off foot wrist shot. It's not like Kessel or many other 30+ scorers who do it purposely all the time; he'll actually slide the puck forth and he'll retain blade contact through out the entire motion, exactly how the guys used to do it with an exception. The exception is that he will uncoil his body at an angle so that he pressures the stick down. You'll also see him sort of kick his left leg- that's like in tennis when you see guys like Federer jumping to hit forehands; you time it with the forward movement so that the weight in movement from either sides of your center mass is more or less equal.

Of course, like all players, he has dozens of ways to shoot, but he seems to privilege this one more than often. From a physics standpoint, if he gets a similar torsion load (that's when you bend the stick) and can retain puck contact for longer, his shoot will move faster which may explain why he tends to shoot so much harder than everyone else: he found a way to put more energy into his shot while hiding his intentions.
____________
I learn all about that with a frame by frame montage of pictures of him as well as some slow-motions. You can also confirm this information when you hear him shoot. The snapping noise isn't quite the same. You hear the stick snap, but not some ice contact and, as a subjective income, I can shoot both ways and when I do a wrist shot, I don't feel the puck has came off my blade at any point except when it's gone for good.

What you however refer to might be some in-stride form of shooting. Players currently work hard on that... Semin does have some way to synchronize that movement with his skating, but I here speak of a little sudden jump which occurs in between two strides. Many NHLers will do this if they can't skate around the defenseman: once they get even with him, they use their hang time to come down on the stick and shoot harder. That is inevitably a snap-shot like movement.

*If you want an example of how he hides this shot, look at the picture underneath my nickname. If he was to shoot, he'd take a step forward with his right leg more toward his stick side and he would leave his hands and the puck there. See how he'd be kind of turned around with his left leg up? If you do that and people can react, they're very good... it takes a fraction of a second to do and, before they know you're in shooting position, you're already moving the stick forward.

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