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Anyone have advice for a beginner?

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Old
01-19-2012, 12:48 PM
  #1
Aftcomet*
 
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Anyone have advice for a beginner?

I've loved hockey for the most of my life. I wasn't able to afford it when I was young and I always had thought that after 14 it was too late to play. That was obviously incorrect thinking. So I'm 20 years old right now. My friends told me to try Beer League with them in the summer (this coming one) and I decided to. So I bought all the equipment (I spent quite a bit of money on it all since I figure it'll offer better protection and I'll probably be using it for a long time.) The skates I use are Easton EQ5s. I find them very comfortable and they fit my feet perfectly.

So I went skating with my friends today (it was my first time). I wore a helmet, gloves, and shin pads (to protect my knees). My friends are both excellent skaters. I on the other hand am not. I can't stop. I can't skate backwards. I was able to skate forwards at a good pace and I was also able to do crossovers (going from right to left is okay but left to right is a little hard.) I was able to go fairly fast but I kept losing my balance (not falling just really wobbly) so I decided to slow the pace down. I am able to turn left and right without difficulty. But again, my overall balance is terrible. I tried to stop but I wiped out pretty hard (one time straight into the boards). But I was determined to keep at it so I got up. After an hour and a half though my feet started killing me and I lost all strength in them. So that made it worse.

Some of the stuff people are able to do seems impossible to me. Like pivoting, spinning, switching from forwards to backwards, skating backwards fast and doing crossovers while doing so. I feel like it'll take me a decade to get to that level. All in all it was a little embarrassing. There's a big mental aspect to it too. One is fear but two is the embarrassment. I got chirped quite a bit. Some of those younger kids are really good. But it's okay, I know I suck.

I figure it'll get better with hard work and perseverance. I think my feet have to strengthen as well. I'm also quite out of shape these days (not fat), just don't have the muscle and conditioning that I used to. School is extremely busy these days. I heard that strengthening your core helps a lot overall and will give you better balance. I'm going to find time to work on that when I'm not on the ice. Right now I can only go once a week for 2 - 3.5 hours. I don't know if that'll be enough. I'm also considering taking lessons. I have coordinated feet from playing soccer at a high level, but I don't think that really translates to hockey in any significant way.

Would you pros have any advice to give me? I suppose the only asset I have right now is my determination. I'm really willing to do anything to get better. I'm concentrating to get over the fear factor. At the start I wasn't afraid but trying to stop and crashing head first into the boards surely doesn't help. The second time kind of did me in (not physically but my thought process was a lot different).

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01-19-2012, 01:11 PM
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There's a big gear guide up top stickied (lots of them actually) and a big thread on the second page for beginners too.

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01-19-2012, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
There's a big gear guide up top stickied (lots of them actually) and a big thread on the second page for beginners too.
Thanks.

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01-19-2012, 05:34 PM
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Here is the link! You are not alone!
http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...d.php?t=831857

Just keep skating. I never thought I'd be able to do the things I can do now. It's very satisfying when people make comments assuming I've been skating my whole life when I only just started a year and a half ago. You'll get there too if you practice!

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01-19-2012, 06:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beth View Post
Here is the link! You are not alone!
http://hfboards.hockeysfuture.com/sh...d.php?t=831857

Just keep skating. I never thought I'd be able to do the things I can do now. It's very satisfying when people make comments assuming I've been skating my whole life when I only just started a year and a half ago. You'll get there too if you practice!
Thanks! My main question is how long do you think it will be until I can skate well? I am only able to practice up once a week 2 - 3.5 hours a week. I know what I have to do and how to do it. It's just learning the process and acquiring the muscle memory.

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01-19-2012, 07:01 PM
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Don't be embarrassed or get discouraged; everyone has to start somewhere. The more time you spend on the ice, the easier it will come to you and the more comfortable you'll feel out there. Keep working on your weaknesses. You'll love beer league. As long as you know the basics, you'll be fine.

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01-19-2012, 07:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Axman View Post
Don't be embarrassed or get discouraged; everyone has to start somewhere. The more time you spend on the ice, the easier it will come to you and the more comfortable you'll feel out there. Keep working on your weaknesses. You'll love beer league. As long as you know the basics, you'll be fine.
Thanks. I'm really determined to get better. I thought I was determined before, but getting on the ice today really showed me how much I love it. I got beat up a little but now I only want it more.

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01-19-2012, 07:13 PM
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Perserverance and a good attitude are your best assets.
Keep working at it, listen to advice that your friends give you.
I was in a similar (but slower) boat as you a few years ago. I was thirty-five when I first tied on a pair of skates and it took me a while. Three years later, I got invited me to play in a Thursday night pick-up.
Still working on all aspects of my game (skating especially), but I've gotten compliments from the guys about my progression.


Good luck.
Keep us apprised.

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01-19-2012, 07:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
Thanks! My main question is how long do you think it will be until I can skate well? I am only able to practice up once a week 2 - 3.5 hours a week. I know what I have to do and how to do it. It's just learning the process and acquiring the muscle memory.
It really depends on a lot of things, but you're young, so I imagine you'll be able to pick it up quickly. But don't waste your little bit of ice time simply going in circles around the rink, make the most of it. Get your gear on, push yourself out of your comfort zone and try those pivots and force yourself to skate backwards and do a lot of one-foot drills. Find your edges and fall a LOT, then you'll learn a lot faster. Even if you can't do this stuff right away, just by attempting it you're giving your neurons valuable information that they'll build on. Lessons will help, too. Good luck and let us know how you progress!

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01-19-2012, 07:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
I've loved hockey for the most of my life. I wasn't able to afford it when I was young and I always had thought that after 14 it was too late to play. That was obviously incorrect thinking. So I'm 20 years old right now. My friends told me to try Beer League with them in the summer (this coming one) and I decided to. So I bought all the equipment (I spent quite a bit of money on it all since I figure it'll offer better protection and I'll probably be using it for a long time.) The skates I use are Easton EQ5s. I find them very comfortable and they fit my feet perfectly.
I started playing at 20 too and you might feel like you have started late but there are still plenty of good times ahead of you in hockey - just keep up the practice. Before anything you should really check that your equipment does actually fit perfectly. When I first started I thought that I had the 'perfect' fit when in fact after much research I found out I had been skating in a whole size too big and with no arch support for 5 years... properly fitted skates are essential - tie those laces up tight to get good support. Your toes should be just touching or just shy of the toe cap and the skate should accommodate your arch and instep well. Width should be proper so your foot isn't moving around too much or sore from tightness. Your heel shouldn't be lifting with the laces done up either.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
So I went skating with my friends today (it was my first time). I wore a helmet, gloves, and shin pads (to protect my knees). My friends are both excellent skaters. I on the other hand am not. I can't stop. I can't skate backwards. I was able to skate forwards at a good pace and I was also able to do crossovers (going from right to left is okay but left to right is a little hard.) I was able to go fairly fast but I kept losing my balance (not falling just really wobbly) so I decided to slow the pace down. I am able to turn left and right without difficulty. But again, my overall balance is terrible. I tried to stop but I wiped out pretty hard (one time straight into the boards). But I was determined to keep at it so I got up. After an hour and a half though my feet started killing me and I lost all strength in them. So that made it worse.
If it starts to get really sore then stop and go again later. It takes a while to break in skates and the recovery time from seriously sore feet will slow down your progress overall. Work on separate areas like only crossovers instead of combining everything in one session as it's better to become adept at that one thing before moving on. You will learn faster this way too. I know I wiped out big time when learning how to stop but just take it slow at first and then increase speed as you feel more confident. Don't do it skating towards the boards fast when starting out! Focus on technique before going all out. When I noticed my balance was put forward from the middle of my feet just before I stopped I felt more confident doing it:

[=====|===] -->

You will have several 'eureka' moments when you find out the best way to do things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
Some of the stuff people are able to do seems impossible to me. Like pivoting, spinning, switching from forwards to backwards, skating backwards fast and doing crossovers while doing so. I feel like it'll take me a decade to get to that level. All in all it was a little embarrassing. There's a big mental aspect to it too. One is fear but two is the embarrassment. I got chirped quite a bit. Some of those younger kids are really good. But it's okay, I know I suck.
You'll be able to do all those things in time. The key is practice! When I got in to hockey I didn't even know how to skate but I was determined enough to go to the rink 2-3 times a week for 2 months to get better. My friend went with me which was good of him but even if he didn't I would have gone myself. The motivation was that I just wanted to play hockey eventually. At the end of those 2 months I could do (both lefts and rights) stops, crossovers, skate backwards and backwards crossovers all to a reasonable level. Then as I skated more in another month it all became a little more refined. Don't worry about being embarrassed, just get right in to it. Some guys will give you pointers here and there too. Don't ever be discouraged by some guys who never learned what the point was of playing team sports at a non professional level. There are some in every league.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
I figure it'll get better with hard work and perseverance. I think my feet have to strengthen as well. I'm also quite out of shape these days (not fat), just don't have the muscle and conditioning that I used to. School is extremely busy these days. I heard that strengthening your core helps a lot overall and will give you better balance. I'm going to find time to work on that when I'm not on the ice. Right now I can only go once a week for 2 - 3.5 hours. I don't know if that'll be enough. I'm also considering taking lessons. I have coordinated feet from playing soccer at a high level, but I don't think that really translates to hockey in any significant way.
Lessons are a good way to get proper technique down. Once you have got that you can then practice what you've learned by yourself. Things like your posture and stance are important and can be hard to adjust to if bad habits already exist. You stamina will improve over time just from going skating more and more. Once you start playing games and skating say twice a week you will be fine. At the start of new seasons everyone is out of shape anyway!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
Would you pros have any advice to give me? I suppose the only asset I have right now is my determination. I'm really willing to do anything to get better. I'm concentrating to get over the fear factor. At the start I wasn't afraid but trying to stop and crashing head first into the boards surely doesn't help. The second time kind of did me in (not physically but my thought process was a lot different).
This is the best thing you need to get started. This is all I had too when I started out. Learning to play hockey was one of the best decisions of my life and I just wish I had done it way earlier. I haven't taken a break since I started 20 and now I am 29. You still have a tonn of fun ahead of you and once you get to new levels you will be giving pointers to new skaters in no time.

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Old
01-19-2012, 07:50 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJDevs430 View Post
Perserverance and a good attitude are your best assets.
Keep working at it, listen to advice that your friends give you.
I was in a similar (but slower) boat as you a few years ago. I was thirty-five when I first tied on a pair of skates and it took me a while. Three years later, I got invited me to play in a Thursday night pick-up.
Still working on all aspects of my game (skating especially), but I've gotten compliments from the guys about my progression.


Good luck.
Keep us apprised.
Thanks. I'm going to work hard.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beth View Post
It really depends on a lot of things, but you're young, so I imagine you'll be able to pick it up quickly. But don't waste your little bit of ice time simply going in circles around the rink, make the most of it. Get your gear on, push yourself out of your comfort zone and try those pivots and force yourself to skate backwards and do a lot of one-foot drills. Find your edges and fall a LOT, then you'll learn a lot faster. Even if you can't do this stuff right away, just by attempting it you're giving your neurons valuable information that they'll build on. Lessons will help, too. Good luck and let us know how you progress!
So I won't look silly wearing everything? I was putting on shin pads to protect my knees today and random people were telling me that nobody would be taking shots at me but I was trying to explain that it was for different reasons.

I think your advice on maximizing my ice time is very good. While I didn't do anything major today I was trying to just get a good feel for the ice. But my next time I'm going to slowly try everything. I'm going to try going backwards slowly. I found some good videos on Youtube from howtohockeydotcom. They show you really good tips and exercises on stopping and going backwards which I'm going to try next time.

I was able to make tight turns, skate almost as fast as anyone (although I chose not to because I was prone to losing my balance bad at any time and I didn't know how to stop), do crossovers, and zig zag. I can't wait for the next time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vexXed View Post
I started playing at 20 too and you might feel like you have started late but there are still plenty of good times ahead of you in hockey - just keep up the practice. Before anything you should really check that your equipment does actually fit perfectly. When I first started I thought that I had the 'perfect' fit when in fact after much research I found out I had been skating in a whole size too big and with no arch support for 5 years... properly fitted skates are essential - tie those laces up tight to get good support. Your toes should be just touching or just shy of the toe cap and the skate should accommodate your arch and instep well. Width should be proper so your foot isn't moving around too much or sore from tightness. Your heel shouldn't be lifting with the laces done up either.



If it starts to get really sore then stop and go again later. It takes a while to break in skates and the recovery time from seriously sore feet will slow down your progress overall. Work on separate areas like only crossovers instead of combining everything in one session as it's better to become adept at that one thing before moving on. You will learn faster this way too. I know I wiped out big time when learning how to stop but just take it slow at first and then increase speed as you feel more confident. Don't do it skating towards the boards fast when starting out! Focus on technique before going all out. When I noticed my balance was put forward from the middle of my feet just before I stopped I felt more confident doing it:

[=====|===] -->

You will have several 'eureka' moments when you find out the best way to do things.



You'll be able to do all those things in time. The key is practice! When I got in to hockey I didn't even know how to skate but I was determined enough to go to the rink 2-3 times a week for 2 months to get better. My friend went with me which was good of him but even if he didn't I would have gone myself. The motivation was that I just wanted to play hockey eventually. At the end of those 2 months I could do (both lefts and rights) stops, crossovers, skate backwards and backwards crossovers all to a reasonable level. Then as I skated more in another month it all became a little more refined. Don't worry about being embarrassed, just get right in to it. Some guys will give you pointers here and there too. Don't ever be discouraged by some guys who never learned what the point was of playing team sports at a non professional level. There are some in every league.



Lessons are a good way to get proper technique down. Once you have got that you can then practice what you've learned by yourself. Things like your posture and stance are important and can be hard to adjust to if bad habits already exist. You stamina will improve over time just from going skating more and more. Once you start playing games and skating say twice a week you will be fine. At the start of new seasons everyone is out of shape anyway!



This is the best thing you need to get started. This is all I had too when I started out. Learning to play hockey was one of the best decisions of my life and I just wish I had done it way earlier. I haven't taken a break since I started 20 and now I am 29. You still have a tonn of fun ahead of you and once you get to new levels you will be giving pointers to new skaters in no time.
Thank you for this post. I've made sure my skates fit perfectly. My toes just brush the end. I actually have flat feet so my arches hurt because the support was too good


Last edited by Aftcomet*: 01-19-2012 at 07:58 PM.
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Old
01-19-2012, 09:13 PM
  #12
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http://dropin.mississauga.ca/

http://www.hockeytoronto.com/index.cfm?cat=192

http://www.brampton.ca/en/residents/...ules-Fees.aspx

Here are 3 lists of all pickup hockey in Sauga/Toronto/Brampton. Hit the ice more often and practise! That's what I did over the course of last year and I've improved drastically in my skating. It can be done!

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01-19-2012, 10:28 PM
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Keep it up!

I started playing at age 37 and am loving it four and a half years later!

Take it slow, concentrate and focus on the technique first - that means your feel of balance and the feel of your feet as you skate. There are lots of videos out there explaining the skating stride and so on.

I'll list a couple here which I find great in terms of how the guy explains it. It has some skating but more on playing hockey. However, check out the Forward Stride video.

http://www.hockeyshare.com/video/

or the same thing on YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4rif...layer_embedded

Another site is BusinessRecovery's YouTube channel

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbwTW...feature=relmfu

- this site has great drills to practice skating in all the things you are looking to learn

Good luck!

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01-20-2012, 12:52 AM
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My advice:

Be Safe- Always wear full, high quality, properly sized equipment. As you get older, have bills to pay, and possibly mouths to feed this becomes even more important.


Work Hard-You'll get out of it what you put into it. Eat right, get in shape, learn the game, skate hard, constantly try and get better, etc.

Have Fun- A beginner at your age will never be able to do this for a living. This is for fun only. Some people, including myself, tend to forget that. Don't be a dk on the ice, don't be too hard on yourself, etc.

I struggle with the fact that despite how hard I work at it, at age 39 and with only ~3yrs. total at forward(old goalie), I will simply never be as good as guys who played out since they were young and never stopped. Just be passionate about it and become the best you can be. Good luck.

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01-20-2012, 12:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Rink Bum View Post
Keep it up!

I started playing at age 37 and am loving it four and a half years later!


Good luck!
Good for you man. I started up again at 38 after a 15 year layoff. It's been painful, frustrating, and expensive, but has been a complete blast. No regrets

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01-20-2012, 09:20 AM
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Hey..

through to early last month I was only a 36 year old casual skater who had been on the ice maybe a handful of times in the past 10 years.

In Dec. I picked up some skates to get some time in at the local outdoor rink (lucky to live in Winnipeg.. I guess!) and started skating. Could only snowplow stop / skate in circles etc...

Skating 3 days a week for a couple of weeks later I taught myself how to stop well on my strong side, basic backwards, pivots, and some stick handling "Skills".

Have now purchased the gear, enrolled in a powerskating course and gone through the first few sessions. I am likely one of the worst skaters in the program. Everyone in the class has been supportive, i'm having a blast and i am picking up a ton of pointers on stance, posture etc... to take to my outdoor skating time. You tube advise was good... but for my learning process there is nothing better than watching the instructor through a drill, attempt it yourself, and watch your peers perform.

At the end of our class we have a 10min full ice scrimmage and i am pretty useless and feel like a pylon but am improving weekly. It's been a good opportunity to safely skate (and fall) in a hockey setting. Through this course hope to be comfortable enough the get into some pick up sessions.

Make the best use of your time to get comfortable on the ice. Get into a beginner hockey class where you can comfortably skate and learn with your full gear. Keep at it and I'll bet you will be surprised how quickly you pick it up!

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01-20-2012, 10:51 AM
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Haven't read the thread so this may have all be said before...

1. Get private lessons from someone who teaches hockey skating. Making sure you are doing things right from the start and not building bad habits is more important than just getting ice time.

2. Give it time for your body to adjust to this alien world of being on skates. Expect soreness as you use new muscles and expect it to take some time to build muscle memory. It won't take long and before you know it you will see improvement. Don't get discouraged in the meantime.

3. Use your time on the ice wisely. Don't waste time messing around with your buddies yet, work on your skating, even if that means alone.

4. Disregard any and all a-holes that say anything negative to you on the ice, unless it relates to you creating a safety hazard. Anyone who doesn't want to help a beginner get better at this game is a loser that doesn't warrant your concern. Anyone who has the guts to lace up skates and try deserves respect and assistance, not scorn. At an open skate and shoot, try to find quiet areas of the ice to practice and stay away from the front of the net and behind the net.

Oh and bend your knees. A lot. Don't hunch, bend. Like sitting on the edge of a chair.

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01-22-2012, 08:59 AM
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skate skate and more skating.....the hockey skills will come faster than the skating...so that's where your time should be

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01-22-2012, 01:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aftcomet View Post
I can't stop. I can't skate backwards. I was able to skate forwards at a good pace and I was also able to do crossovers (going from right to left is okay but left to right is a little hard.) I was able to go fairly fast but I kept losing my balance (not falling just really wobbly) so I decided to slow the pace down. I am able to turn left and right without difficulty. But again, my overall balance is terrible. I tried to stop but I wiped out pretty hard (one time straight into the boards). But I was determined to keep at it so I got up. After an hour and a half though my feet started killing me and I lost all strength in them. So that made it worse.

Some of the stuff people are able to do seems impossible to me. Like pivoting, spinning, switching from forwards to backwards, skating backwards fast and doing crossovers while doing so. I feel like it'll take me a decade to get to that level. All in all it was a little embarrassing. There's a big mental aspect to it too. One is fear but two is the embarrassment. I got chirped quite a bit. Some of those younger kids are really good. But it's okay, I know I suck.

I figure it'll get better with hard work and perseverance. I think my feet have to strengthen as well. I'm also quite out of shape these days (not fat), just don't have the muscle and conditioning that I used to. School is extremely busy these days. I heard that strengthening your core helps a lot overall and will give you better balance. I'm going to find time to work on that when I'm not on the ice. Right now I can only go once a week for 2 - 3.5 hours. I don't know if that'll be enough. I'm also considering taking lessons. I have coordinated feet from playing soccer at a high level, but I don't think that really translates to hockey in any significant way.

Would you pros have any advice to give me? I suppose the only asset I have right now is my determination. I'm really willing to do anything to get better. I'm concentrating to get over the fear factor. At the start I wasn't afraid but trying to stop and crashing head first into the boards surely doesn't help. The second time kind of did me in (not physically but my thought process was a lot different).
Dude, you have asked questions that are too long to explain on this forum. Send me a PM and I will explain all this in detail. Plus, check out all of the posts that I have done on this forum. It might help.

Head coach.

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01-22-2012, 03:08 PM
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Practice, just stick with it, I was worse then you when I started now my skating is amazing, keep practicing, you have to learn it.

Skating can't be taught, you just have to learn.

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01-22-2012, 06:26 PM
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I'm glad I found this thread I suck at skating and have always been discouraged to go skating, I think now i'm going to go and try to get better

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01-22-2012, 10:42 PM
  #22
goonx
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Hey there,

Just coming in to give you some words of wisdom and my story. So I've skated since i was young (around the age of 12-13) and was a fairly decent recreational skater. I could do cross-over and stops. However, I stopped since highschool and pretty much lost interest in skating. Two years ago, I got addicted to hockey. I went to a bar with a few friends and watched some NHL games. Fell in love with that.

Starting in my 4th year of my undergrad, I started to skate again in hopes of one day playing hockey at a league level. Somewhat similar to where you are at right now. I stopped in the summer (which i shoudn't have) and resumed this september.

This year, I've constantly been skating at my local rinks for the last 4 months. I go around 2-3 times a week. I'm now playing at the beginner level and joined two city of toronto and markham beginner courses. All I have to say is that the feeling right now while playing hockey is awesome. I would have never thought I would be doing this two years ago but here I am.

My best advice list:
Get properly fitted skates. My skating ability really took off after getting a new pair of skates and getting proper arch support. I have extremely flat feet and i ended up having to get a custom pair of skate orthotics. No regrets on spending money where it should be spent.

Go to Adult skating sessions. TBH public skating sessions are way too crowded and with a lot of kids running around. There's absolutely not enough room for you to have any constructive practice. I paid $3 to go to adult skating sessions and progressed quickly with my skating once i got more room on the ice. Don't be afraid about falling. Learn to fall properly and get knee pads. If you don't fall, it means you're not pushing yourself to the limit and you'll always stay in your "Comfort bubble". The best skating sessions are ones offered by your university/college arenas. Plenty of skating space and it's usually free.

Proper way to fall:
On your A$$
On your side
On your knees
Feet first
Never:
head first
backwards with your head leading.

I know it might sound stupid to "learn how to fall" but with enough experience and practice, I can tell you there's a proper way and improper way to fall which leads to serious injuries. That's why protective equipment like knee pads are very important prior to the point where you "figure out" how to fall.

Go on youtube and look at skating drills. There's a lot of quality material already out there. I recently bought the laura stamm power skating book as well. It's helpful but definitely not as "Golden" as i thought it would be. Youtube videos are much better.

Shinny hockey. I only started playing this recently but wish i found out much earlier. Pretty much it allows you to see what level you're at and what you need to improve on. More likely than not, it's usually the stick handling ability. If there's a disparity between your skating and stick handling, you're overall hockey game will suffer.

Skating is still the #1 priority. 90% of the game will be played without the puck on your stick. Moreover, stick handling can be worked on off-ice unlike skating. Focus on your skating now and practice on your stick handling off-ice. Practice practice practice


Last edited by goonx: 01-22-2012 at 10:58 PM.
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01-23-2012, 09:35 AM
  #23
torped929
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Dude we are on the same boat. My son recently got the itch to play so we signed him up for a learn to skate program. I have never skated before in my life til now and have taught myself what I know through youtube lol. Yesterday we went to a pond and played a little shinny with much more accomplished guys and we were both combine to equal 1 guy so it was a 4 on 3. We had a blast and we did great we each ended up with 1G and 1A and at least 20 very comical falls. Dont be afraid to get out there and have fun. You only live once

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01-23-2012, 11:07 PM
  #24
nystromshairstylist
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Good for you man. I started up again at 38 after a 15 year layoff. It's been painful, frustrating, and expensive, but has been a complete blast. No regrets
I started April 2010 as a 42 year old, and it took me until very recently to get to a point in my skating where most motions are being performed on the ice without having to think first what to do.

I practiced my skating 3-4x week almost every week until now (took July and August of this summer as i just needed a break - as did my left knee and hip), but I cannot help but laugh when I read a 20-year old thinking they are "late in the day to start".

A 20 year old has 30-40 years of good hockey ahead of them, plenty of time to learn...put in the time, and you WILL get better. If a fat, old bum like me can do it - you most certainly can.

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01-26-2012, 05:30 PM
  #25
Guffaw
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
I started April 2010 as a 42 year old, and it took me until very recently to get to a point in my skating where most motions are being performed on the ice without having to think first what to do.

I practiced my skating 3-4x week almost every week until now (took July and August of this summer as i just needed a break - as did my left knee and hip), but I cannot help but laugh when I read a 20-year old thinking they are "late in the day to start".

A 20 year old has 30-40 years of good hockey ahead of them, plenty of time to learn...put in the time, and you WILL get better. If a fat, old bum like me can do it - you most certainly can.
Well said. Can't make up for lost time. I do believe that if your in shape, work at your skills, work your a** off on the ice, and play smart you can be a productive Mens league player well into your 50's. I plan on it

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