HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

One timing

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
04-24-2011, 11:59 AM
  #1
Sensfanman
Registered User
 
Sensfanman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Country: Canada
Posts: 10,181
vCash: 500
One timing

Hey all,

I'm having a lot of trouble getting off a good shot from a pass. I usually park my ass in front of the net while my wingers go in the corners to get the puck. My only problem is that whenever a pass comes, I can't get a solid shot off and either flub it or take too long setting up. Now this was only my first game back in a while but I've been practicing a lot with my dad and I can't seem to get a clean shot off, regardless of shot type.

I figure it's a timing thing but what are tips to practice more efficiently?

Thanks!

Sensfanman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-24-2011, 12:55 PM
  #2
Jimmy Carter
Avs/Leafs fan
 
Jimmy Carter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Western NY
Country: United States
Posts: 1,244
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sensfanman View Post
Hey all,

I'm having a lot of trouble getting off a good shot from a pass. I usually park my ass in front of the net while my wingers go in the corners to get the puck. My only problem is that whenever a pass comes, I can't get a solid shot off and either flub it or take too long setting up. Now this was only my first game back in a while but I've been practicing a lot with my dad and I can't seem to get a clean shot off, regardless of shot type.

I figure it's a timing thing but what are tips to practice more efficiently?

Thanks!
Sorry, I'm not the greatest at one-timers myself, but I have been improving on it quite a bit lately. The one thing that really helped me out was figuring out where it is that I like the puck to be when I shoot it (front foot, back foot, in between). If you know where you get your best shot from you can try and adjust to the puck to get it lined up in that sweet spot.

Trying to get one off right in front of the net is a bit more difficult, I usually try to tip in a pass close to the net rather then actually try and get a shot off.

Jimmy Carter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-26-2011, 12:22 AM
  #3
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
An easy way to practice alone is to pass to yourself using the kickplate along the boards. Pass the puck hard enough to rebound to your position and onetime the puck either with a snapshot or slapshot. You can even just keep the puck going back and forth without shooting on goal, just redirect or "onetime" the puck back at the kickplate along the bottom of the boards.

I did this for years and it helped a lot back when I sucked in the 1970s as a 10 year old. The reason this helps is that YOU control the speed of the pass and eventually you get better and faster with the timing.

I would venture to guess that your main problem is clenching up on the stick and not relaxing during game situations. A deer in headlights kind of thing. Relax ... cradle and deliver the puck rather than have it explode because you tensed up too stiff.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-26-2011, 12:32 AM
  #4
ponder
Registered User
 
ponder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 11,627
vCash: 500
It's also a lot easier to take one timers from your off wing. As a right handed shot, for me one timers are pretty effortless when I'm on the left wing receiving a good pass from the right wing, but if I'm on the right wing receiving a pass from the left wing I generally won't even go for the one timer, I'll just take the pass and they to get a quick shot off.

ponder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-26-2011, 02:59 PM
  #5
Hockeyfan68
Registered User
 
Hockeyfan68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Lewiston, ME USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,418
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
It's also a lot easier to take one timers from your off wing. As a right handed shot, for me one timers are pretty effortless when I'm on the left wing receiving a good pass from the right wing, but if I'm on the right wing receiving a pass from the left wing I generally won't even go for the one timer, I'll just take the pass and they to get a quick shot off.
Very true, the hardest one timer for me is cutting to the left horizontally as I shoot lefty. Almost always it is a fight to keep your balance in order to rip a good one and in game situations I'll actually fall to the ice on my left shoulder after the followthrough but got off the good shot. I call it shooting across your body not sure if that makes sense or not.

Hockeyfan68 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
04-30-2011, 11:03 PM
  #6
jim lahey
 
jim lahey's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: canada
Posts: 100
vCash: 500
timing dude

jim lahey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
05-16-2011, 06:19 PM
  #7
dbargaehr
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 29
vCash: 500
I had a very similar problem up until pretty recently. Now I fixed it. My one-timers still aren't perfect, but getting much better.

A few pieces of advice (they are all "IMO, so be warned!")

1) Practice. A LOT. I spent about 15 minutes each practice passing back and forth with a teammate and taking one timers at an open net. After 3 practices, I started getting consistent.
2) Practice with slow-moving passes first. Once you've gotten consistent at nailing the slower ones, have the passer ramp up his speed. This will help your timing.
3) Practice with SNAP shots first. I feel like the raised stick for the slapshot can throw off timing...I also feel that my snap shot is much more accurate than a slap shot when taking one-timers (and thus I have a better chance of hitting the wide-open side of the net). After you've got the snap shot down, work your way up to heavy slappers. And let's face it: f you're parking in the slot, the big wind up is probably not necessary and maybe not even possible, depending on how badly the defender is tying you up.
4) I noticed that a lot of the time when the shot would wobble/flutter that I was taking those shots from the toe of my blade (or the area between the middle and the toe). I've seen several videos, etc. where players say to take slap shots off of the toe, but I find that when I take shots near the heel I get much higher accuracy and speed. It may differ for you, but getting nearer to the heel was the difference maker for me.
5) Before the pass arrives I usually take a quick peek at the net. That peek tremendously lent to my accuracy when I was consistently shooting wide during practice. In-game, it lets you know if the goalie is reading the pass and you shouldn't take the shot, if someone is moving to block the shot, etc...
6) The final issue I had was fine-tuning my accuracy. I noticed that the puck would consistently go wider than I thought, in the east or west direction the pass was travelling. After actually thinking about it, it makes sense just due to standard momentum. While you are transferring new energy into the puck in the direction you want it to travel, it is still going to have some momentum from the pass. The more parallel to your blade the pass is, the more noticeable this effect is; inversely, the more perpendicular the pass is to your blade, the less noticeable it is. That, I imagine, is where you might be having a lot of difficulty. If the winger is standing in the corner and you're in the low slot, then chances are your blade is essentially parallel to the pass, making timing much more difficult. But if, say, you were a right-hander standing on the left circle dot while you received a pass from the other circle, your blade is at a 45-degree angle (roughly) to the pass as you take the shot. My solution was simply looking to hit a point slightly to the right of my target (I shoot right, and therefore the pass is generally moving left).

Hope this wasn't too much of a novel; I'm just excited I finally figured it out and I'm hoping at least one of these tips helps someone else solve the problem, too.

dbargaehr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:31 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.