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Old
01-22-2011, 10:50 AM
  #1
doug5984
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Need som help / advice

I want to start playing hockey again, I played roller hockey for about 7 years when I was a kid (up til 16) we didn't have any ice rinks in town- now we have had some for a few years, and I want to start playing again. I haven't picked up a hockey stick in 10 years (I'm 26 now). We don't really have any hockey shops within driving distance so buying gear is tough (live in Louisiana). I have been searching hockey monkey and see some pretty good deals out there. I know that a lot of equipment is personal preference but do you think I'd be safe ordering stuff online? So that's part 1 of needing help- I need to gear up, and equipment has changed a good bit since my time away.

Now onto part 2- what's the best way to get back into the sport, I don't want to go sign up for a league and embarrass myself for a few months while I get my feet under me. I was thinking of ordering skates, stick, gloves, and a helmet and going to stick & puck sessions for a couple months to relearn the game and learn how to shoot on ice.

So any advice for a new-noob on getting back into the sport, ordering equipment, and making the transition from roller to ice hockey.

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01-22-2011, 11:03 AM
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doug5984
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Guess a little more background info may be needed- grew up playing center, used a easton cyclone as I mainly shot wrist shots- but now that I'm older / stronger I think a little more flex would really help my shot. For a curve I like a heal curve, simliar to the easton Parise, right handed shot.

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01-22-2011, 11:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug5984 View Post

Now onto part 2- what's the best way to get back into the sport, I don't want to go sign up for a league and embarrass myself for a few months while I get my feet under me. I was thinking of ordering skates, stick, gloves, and a helmet and going to stick & puck sessions for a couple months to relearn the game and learn how to shoot on ice.
For this part of it Id say go the a handful of stick times just to see how you can skate, if you got your skating down enough to where you aren't falling then join up with a league asap. Id bet there is a beginner league or lower level with many new people so you should feel pretty comfortable out there in that environment and can learn all the ins and outs of the game without too many pressures, pretty much what I did.

Now since you did play at the age of 16...even if it was roller from 10 years ago, Id honestly say after a few stick sessions you will probably be fine to join up with a intermediate mens league pretty quick. Just get a feel for others skill around you and ask them what leagues etc they are in or recommend. If you got good hands and already know how the game works then the beginners league might be a little frustrating for you, so always try and play up if you are comfortable with it.

And most important thing....have fun, hockey is a learning process and everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, it will come with time.

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01-22-2011, 03:56 PM
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Check ebay for good deals too, I dont really care for hockey monkey

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01-22-2011, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrydanish View Post
For this part of it Id say go the a handful of stick times just to see how you can skate, if you got your skating down enough to where you aren't falling then join up with a league asap. Id bet there is a beginner league or lower level with many new people so you should feel pretty comfortable out there in that environment and can learn all the ins and outs of the game without too many pressures, pretty much what I did.

Now since you did play at the age of 16...even if it was roller from 10 years ago, Id honestly say after a few stick sessions you will probably be fine to join up with a intermediate mens league pretty quick. Just get a feel for others skill around you and ask them what leagues etc they are in or recommend. If you got good hands and already know how the game works then the beginners league might be a little frustrating for you, so always try and play up if you are comfortable with it.

And most important thing....have fun, hockey is a learning process and everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, it will come with time.
This is pretty much what happened to me. I played roller for a bunch of years, until the end of middle school. Then after about 4-5 years of no hockey, i started roller again. Then, just in the last couple months, i tried ice for the first time. I first went to a couple "Learn to Skate" classes, but almost instantly graduated from those. So then i did one or two stick and pucks since the league i wanted to join was about to end. I was getting muuuch better every week. I played 2 games in beginner league and got bumped up to the higher league cause my skating was more advanced.

I'm still working on the shot mechanics, though i think i've been negatively impacted by a crappy stick.

About equipment, if none of your roller stuff is reusable, online shopping is great for a lot of things. The only catch is getting the right size and feel of things. What i would recommend is maybe hitting up a local pro shop and try out some things. If you like the feel of a certain brand, then note it down and make sure you have the right size. You can find things a lot cheaper online than at pro shops, so i'd do that. And make sure you check for coupon codes.

Good luck man!

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Old
01-23-2011, 02:14 PM
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Thanks for the advice guys- I'm going to have to order all gear online as the only proshop in driving distance closed down a few months ago. The adult league games are tonight, only 1 league in town that I am aware of so I'm going to drop by tonight and watch to see what the skill level is at. Since hockey isn't that popular down here I bet they'll take any new people even if not the best players. Also, going to order my gear tonight so I can start getting ready....now just need to figure out when the next season will be starting up.

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01-28-2011, 02:44 PM
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I got my gear in today- ran home at lunch to bring it inside (UPS left at the door) and I put on my gloves and held the stick- that is such a great feeling. I got a rush just from that, it's been too long. I'm pumped to get out there as soon as I can and start learning the game again

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01-28-2011, 02:51 PM
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Have a GREAT time!!

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01-28-2011, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug5984 View Post
I'm pumped to get out there as soon as I can and start learning the game again
If you need help, just send me a PM.

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Old
01-28-2011, 04:18 PM
  #10
doug5984
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Thanks- I may need some help this weekend as I look to order the rest of my gear...

So far all I have is:

Bag
Helmet / Visor
Gloves
Stick / Blade / Blade Tape
Skates

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01-28-2011, 04:33 PM
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RainingRats
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Wear a cage. Visors are an unnecessary risk.

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Old
01-31-2011, 05:12 PM
  #12
doug5984
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RainingRats View Post
Wear a cage. Visors are an unnecessary risk.
I might do that... I have a horrible insurance and anything more than a minor cut would suck a lot.


I bought the CCM Vector U+ (08 model) skates on sale from HockeyMonkey- seemed like a good deal, got them in- fit great, light as can be....but I've been reading some reviews that the rocket runners aren't that great? Can someone explain that to me, as a former roller player I really know nothing about ice skates. Some people suggested just changing them out- and I could do that if need be, what size would I need? and what's the positive / negatives of different all the different runners?

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Old
01-31-2011, 10:12 PM
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JaeTM
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Yeah I really like HockeyMonkey. Another good website that was even cheaper then them that I noticed(bought skates for $229 and they're originally $300) was InlineWarehouse. Don't worry about the name, they sell ice stuff too

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Old
02-08-2011, 10:48 AM
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doug5984
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Last night was my first stick and puck session and it was great. I still have my wrist shot (need to work on accuracy a little), slap shot not to bad, my passing / timing / one timers was off a little when we played a very light scrimmage. My skating needs some work, basically just stopping. It was great, my body hurts today- but that was expected. I can't wait for the next session. I figure I'll do this for a couple months then I'll be ready for league play.

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Old
02-08-2011, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug5984 View Post
Last night was my first stick and puck session and it was great. I still have my wrist shot (need to work on accuracy a little), slap shot not to bad, my passing / timing / one timers was off a little when we played a very light scrimmage. My skating needs some work, basically just stopping. It was great, my body hurts today- but that was expected. I can't wait for the next session. I figure I'll do this for a couple months then I'll be ready for league play.
Congrats Doug! I am waiting for my first pair of ice skates (CCM Vector 3's) as I am making the transition from inline to ice also.

I hope I can play in a drop-in game this Friday. No rinks in my area, so I have to make a 90 minute trip to Knoxville, TN for that.

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Old
03-23-2011, 12:35 PM
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I wanted to bump / update this thread (more for myself to read again in a few months)- I've gone to 2 stick and puck sessions every week since then. My skating has improved, still need to work on stopping. I made a great hockey stop once when me and another guy almost collided- but when I try to practice it I can't seem to get it, I stop but it's not always pretty.

My shot and passing has really improved- timing on one timers is better but still not where I think it used to be. My slap shot is what has improved the most, I have been very impressed with how quickly I improved in those areas. I signed up for the adult league which starts in a few weeks and I'm excited to get out there. This past week we did a 2 on 2 half ice scrimmage and I felt very comfortable in "game type" situations. I am a lot better (and a lot more accurate on wrist shots) in games when i don't think and am able to just react.

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03-23-2011, 01:04 PM
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good job man, ive been doing the same as you only im playing inline. ive been playing half court 2vs2 open sessions and the full league starts in 2 weeks. ive learned and developed leaps and bounds past when i first started.

hockey is such an awesome sport to play.

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Old
03-23-2011, 04:21 PM
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Doug - The best part is just doing those small things by reacting, instead of thinking about it too much.

Keep it up and enjoy it.

I am on a temporary hockey hiatus, and it's killing me!

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Old
03-23-2011, 06:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug5984 View Post
My skating has improved, still need to work on stopping. I made a great hockey stop once when me and another guy almost collided- but when I try to practice it I can't seem to get it, I stop but it's not always pretty.
Well, stopping needs to be learned in a progression. You just can't get on and turn sideways. You have to understand the mechanics and how to shift your weight during the stop. If you don't learn how to shift it correctly, it will seem like you are trying to stop and a dime and at this stage of the game, it impossible.

So here is the progression in stopping......

Now, before we start, understand this. Each blade is made up into 9 main sections. The are as follows: Front of the blade, Middle of the Blade, Back of the while balancing in the blades.

Then you have an inside edge of the blade that's made up the same: front inside edge, middle inside edge, back inside edge. Then you have an out edge of the blade that is made up the same

First, you have to go over to the boards and place your hand on the boards for balance. Then you are going to bend both knees so that the weight is even on both skates...kind of like a hockey position.

Now, once you at this point, you want to transfer ALL of that body weight to your left skate. To learn how to do this, I want you to pick up one leg and told it off the ice and count how long you can balance. At first, it will be about 3 second or so, then once you get the hang of it, it should take you about 8 to 10 seconds on one leg. Then do this to the other leg.

Remember we are just working on balance which you will need to stop. Now, once you have that 10 sec down pat on both legs, I want you to transfer all of your weight again on the left skate.

Then with your right skate only, because there is no weight on this skate, I just want you to take off a little layer of ice by have the right leg extended just a little more then the left bent knee and use the middle of your inside edge to shave the ice.

Then, I want you to start to transfer the weight from the left leg to the right skate...very slowly. As you transfer this weight, you will gradually shave that top layer off. If you do this correctly, you will shave off a fine layer of ice, but if you do this incorrectly, you skate will act like it is trying to stop in little moguls. If you transfer the weight to fast, your inside edge will dig hard into the ice and you will not be able to shave that ice. Now make sure you can do it on both legs...not just one and keep doing this until that scrapping is nice and smooth.

Now, one of the main properties of stopping is this so called shaving of the ice when you stop. When you stop, you have to allow the skate to shave the ice when you stop. If you don't allow this shaving, again you are going to fall.

So, the next thing you are going to do is what's known as a Snow Plow stop. To do this effectively, you must be positioned in a hockey stance. Then, with the weight on both blade, I need you to shift the weight to the back 1/3 section of the skates. Because your skates have a rocker, by just picking up your toes just a little, will allow that weight to shift to the back 1/3 of the blade.

Now, once the weight is on the back 1/3 (center blade) The shift will allow you to keep you heels weight towards the back and allow you to shift the weight to the back inside edge.

Now, this next thing is a multi-functional evolution that you will need to do and you will use this technique from now on when you stop.

Now that the weight is on the back 1/3 of the blade, at the same time...you need to shift the weight to the inside back 1/3 of the blade. To do this, you kind of need to leave your skates where they are at and allow your knees to come together...just a little, this will allow that weight to shift to the inside edge.

The next thing you need to do at the same time, is turn the front end of your skate point 3 or 4 degrees toward the center. No, I didn't say together, I said in the director towards the center.

Now, here's the hard part. You have the weight shifted to the back inside edge and you are moving your toes toward a center line by 3 degrees. At this moment, I need you to picture in your mind what you would look like if you were riding a bike and the hand brakes went out and you are on a downward incline with your feet on the ground to stop you. You would use more weight on your heels then on your toes...right?

Ok, so that the same time, I want you to keep the weight shifted toward the back and that the same time, push outwards like you are going to stop and just at this point, you need to shift the weight from the back of the blades to the inside middle of the blades. This will give you balance. The only reason why you had the weight shifted towards the back was ONLY to allow you to move those toes towards that center line by 3 degrees and that's it.

Now, you should be able to stop in a Snow Plow. The once you understand how to do this correctly, you can stop. How, you are saying? You just learned the weight technique it takes to stop.

So, let say you want to stop in the left direction. Balance goes all of the left leg, with the skate in the coasting mode, you turn that right skate ONLY but 3, then 5, then 10, then 20,30,40 50...90 degrees towards center. Once you get to about 20 degrees, the left skate will gradually start to follow the direction of the right skate....allow this to happen. But all of they weight is still on the left leg and you are gradually shift more weight to the right skate as it moves towards 90 degrees.

If you shift that weight to fast, the right skate will not shave and you will only turn. Make sure that you keep the weight on the left skate and gradually transfer the weight to the right skate a little bit at a time. Once you get this down, you will no longer need to use the left leg to balance with.

At that point, when you are stopping with both skates, then it's time to teach you how to stop on one leg on both inside and outside edges on each leg.

Hope this helped.

Head coach

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Old
04-18-2011, 09:39 AM
  #20
doug5984
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Thanks for the help coach- I'm getting closer,but still need some work.

We had out first league game last night, it wasn't pretty. I have a lot of work to do, mainly now my biggest issue is getting in shape so I'm not dead tired at the start of the 2nd. I'm an accountant and just finished tax season so I was sitting at a desk 10 hours a day the past 3 months- so now I have time I can start getting out, jogging, doing something to get in shape. We lost pretty bad, and I feel like I was probably the weakest link on the team (which is understandable it was my first game) but I was hoping to do a lot better.

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Old
04-18-2011, 10:30 AM
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I don't mean to hijack your thread, but I'm in a similar situation and figured I would consolidate space on the forum by posting here as well.

I'm 20 and from California. I played street roller hockey for pretty much my entire childhood up until ~11 years old, including a season or two of recreational roller when I was 13. I knew how to ice skate to a level where I wasn't falling down all over the place just from recreational skating with friends.

This past year I've been studying abroad in the UK, and found the opportunity to follow up on one of my lifelong aspirations of playing actual ice hockey. I joined the university's B team (they play in Div. 3 of the BUIHA), and slowly made my way up from the reserves up to 3rd, 2nd, and then finally 1st line center. I used to be a Sharks season ticket holder, so I do have some sense of what hockey "should" look like, and believe me, our league is pretty damn amateur. It's the UK, so competition in the 3rd division is not particularly serious, and the discrepancy in skill level between teams and players is huge. The average "possession" only consisted of maybe one or two connected passes, with solo runs accounting for the huge majority of the goals. Basically, none of us are very good at all

With our elimination from the nationals yesterday, my ice hockey experience has come to an end, but I really, REALLY enjoyed it! I would love to continue playing in some capacity when I return back to California next year, but I have no idea where I might fit in. I would imagine that the recreational leagues are far more competitive than where I played, and just as the OP said, I don't want to embarrass myself. I think I am a decent skater, but all my shots are pathetically weak compared to what I see on TV, and I can't take a slapshot to save my life... which is in part because I've only ever tried 5-6 times.

Any ideas where I might look to start? Another complication is that the closest ice rink to my university at home is 70 miles away. I have no idea how "good" these recreational leagues are, so I'm just looking for a sense of where I might fit in, if at all. I know I got a very late start. Thanks to all the replies above, they were all very helpful!

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04-18-2011, 11:04 AM
  #22
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Also wanted to add to the person who stated very early on to wear a full cage- that was good advice I didn't take. I just ordered one, our next game isn't for 2 weeks so I'll get it in time. I don't remember exactly what happened, but I tried to stop and fell landed chin first and got pretty bloodied up- maybe could've used a stitch or two but I was able to put a butterfly on it and it's healing good. So the moral of the story- wear a cage, and take the advice people give.

3pac- where are you going to live when you get back to the states? At the rink I am at, there are huge differences in skill levels, but it's about how you described maybe 2 passes and a bunch of break outs.

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Old
04-18-2011, 02:47 PM
  #23
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I still have one year left to complete at UCSB, in Goleta, CA. They were building a brand new ice hockey rink less than 1 mile from my apartment... but apparently it's been delayed at least a year. I did a quick online search and found a place in Oxnard, CA, but it's still ~50 miles. I would be completely happy to drive that to play, but it would be difficult to make that kind of time commitment in advance as a 4th year engineering student.

I'm also hesitant regarding the equipment. I would be glad to fork out the money for it if I knew that I was going to play, but I don't want to spend that much then never play. This year the equipment, aside from skates, was all provided by the university, which was awesome.

The only real obstacle to all this, though, is my actual playing ability. I know people can pick up sports like soccer/baseball/basketball at any age, but they're far more widespread and accessible given the minimal resources required. I'm worried that most 20+ year old hockey players in the US will be reasonably skilled and experienced, so should I sign up for a random league I'll die via hip check in the first 30 seconds.

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04-19-2011, 02:37 PM
  #24
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The only real obstacle to all this, though, is my actual playing ability. I know people can pick up sports like soccer/baseball/basketball at any age, but they're far more widespread and accessible given the minimal resources required. I'm worried that most 20+ year old hockey players in the US will be reasonably skilled and experienced, so should I sign up for a random league I'll die via hip check in the first 30 seconds.
Your best bet would be to locate a development program which will improve your skills, give you confidence and plug you into the scene. From there you can get into some pick-up games where the commitment is low and the environment is fairly friendly.

Stick-Time is great too for working on your skills.

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Old
04-20-2011, 12:29 AM
  #25
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Wear a cage. Visors are an unnecessary risk.
Agreed especially for a novice ... I started playing in the late 70s on teams as a youngster and did not wear anything. I did not wear face protection until the 2000s

I have 2 helmets setup, one with a visor for friendly shinny stuff or co-ed ice that is slow paced and a full cage for my rec league that is fast paced.

I can't believe how long I played with no protection. Even if careful and experieinced you will still get hit in the face. I have had 2 slapshots in the mouth which took out a few teeth as well as cuts above the eyes etc.

be safe!

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