HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Learning to play goalie?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
06-12-2011, 06:21 PM
  #1
Jaromir Jagrbombs
Registered User
 
Jaromir Jagrbombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ottawa, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 482
vCash: 500
Learning to play goalie?

Hey everyone, so I'm a 21 year old guy, been watching hockey my whole life. I've never really had the opportunity to play, other than during gym class in school or the occasional road hockey game/messing around with buddies at the local outdoor rink during the winter.

I'm not that good of a skater, although I have been trying my best to learn over the past couple of years (rollerblading in summer, ice skating in winter).

Anyways, I find that when I have played hockey, I've always liked playing goalie the best. I have great reflexes and conditioning, although I need to work on bulking up size wise.

I was just wondering:

A) what can I do to learn to play goalie for ice hockey
B) what kinds of things can I be doing at home or off the ice to improve reflexes/flexibility etc. and also learn the movements used when playing goalie
C) what are some cheap, but semi-decent pad sets I can look into buying (just to start out with)
D) anything else you guys think would be helpful in my journey to becoming a goalie

Thanks, and I look forward to hearing you guys and gals input!

Jaromir Jagrbombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2011, 09:01 PM
  #2
leeaf83
Registered User
 
leeaf83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Country: Canada
Posts: 1,883
vCash: 500
Send a message via ICQ to leeaf83 Send a message via Yahoo to leeaf83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaromir Jagr Bombs View Post
Hey everyone, so I'm a 21 year old guy, been watching hockey my whole life. I've never really had the opportunity to play, other than during gym class in school or the occasional road hockey game/messing around with buddies at the local outdoor rink during the winter.

I'm not that good of a skater, although I have been trying my best to learn over the past couple of years (rollerblading in summer, ice skating in winter).

Anyways, I find that when I have played hockey, I've always liked playing goalie the best. I have great reflexes and conditioning, although I need to work on bulking up size wise.

I was just wondering:

A) what can I do to learn to play goalie for ice hockey
B) what kinds of things can I be doing at home or off the ice to improve reflexes/flexibility etc. and also learn the movements used when playing goalie
C) what are some cheap, but semi-decent pad sets I can look into buying (just to start out with)
D) anything else you guys think would be helpful in my journey to becoming a goalie

Thanks, and I look forward to hearing you guys and gals input!
I wish you the absolute best of luck as it's a courageous thing to embark on playing the toughest position. First and foremost do everything you can to work on your skating. Skating is extremely important and some people will tell you that it's too late for you to have aspirations of being a goalie having never played before. To those people I say hogwash. Here is the path I'd be taking given your circumstances (and I am a goalie. I'll share my own story later in the post).

1) like i said improve your skating but specifically your backwards skating as this is more critical for goalies than forwards skating (you make more quick backwards movements than quick forwards movements and I dont need to tell you that a split second can be the difference between a goal and a save). But you should start out playing hockey playing out. It'll help with your skating and puckhandling development but you'll also learn a lot about the game. It's critical for a goalie to know what his defense is thinking as well as what the other team is attempting. You should start out as a winger as it is the easiest position to start, then progress to defense to get you into the 'goal preventing' mindset
2) your location says you live in ottawa so I'm assuming you have plenty of shinny hockey available to you. This should be the your first stop the first time you do play goal.
3) if you have the ability to rent or borrow goal equipment great, if not get cheap stuff. A lot of people think they'd enjoy playing goal but hate it when they start for the first time.
4) you'll probably laugh at me for saying this but before you go out, wear your goal pads around the house a little. It's a tough thing to get used to as your legs are not used to having that much weight on them.
5) skates are the trickiest thing. Eventually you'll want to get goalie skates but start out wearing player skates. Right now you probably skate better wearing player skates so you want to try and ease the transition as much as possible
6) Assuming you go through the previous steps I stated and still want to play goal after step #5, your final transition should be to goalie skates. Now be forewarned they are extremely difficult to get used to. I've been refereeing hockey (wearing player skates) and playing goal for over ten years. Never had a problem with player skates but the goalie skates can become extremely painful when you're not used to them (If i was off them for more than a month I'd have this problem). You want to go public skating with them first. To avoid the pain issue, when you're on the ice, always keep your feet moving. Try marching on spot or leaning from one side to the other (this is a good practice anyhow as it keeps you loose).

As far as equipment buying, your best option is play it again sports or any stores that buy and sell used hockey gear. This will be extremely beneficial to you especially if you do decide to play out first like I suggested as it will allow you to recoup some money.When buying goalie gear I'd strongly suggest buying the lighter stuff first. It'll help you get used to the gear. The first time you play, it'll feel like you have 2x4's strapped to each leg and are wearing a flatjacket but once you get used to it, this will come in time. Especially playing shinny first, you dont need the overall heavy gear and you'll learn better wearing smaller gear and having to learn how to stop the puck than getting gigantic stuff and hoping you block as much net as possible and the puck hits you. Also typically the lighter stuff is cheaper.

Later on if everything goes well and you start playing in leagues, then you'll probably start looking at upgrading equipment. Personally speaking I buy one new piece of equipment every year (hard to get used to multiple pieces simutaneously).

You asked about off ice drills, the positioning and stance can be critical. Similar to backcatching in baseball, it's an unnatural stance; you want your knees close together and feet far apart which is not natural. There's a lot of drills you can try to improve hand eye coordination, one simple one being throw a tennis ball against the wall in your goalie stance (or 2 at a time).

You mentioned ball hockey. it's a good way to get the fundamentals going but personally speaking, I refuse to play goal in ball hockey because of how different it is to ice hockey (different equipment, no ice or skates, a ball instead of a puck). You'll have to see if you can do both at a time.

Now I'll share my own personal story which may or may not be relevant;
I played hockey from a young age and was a goalie early on. One problem was I am left-handed which meant that there were not many sets of gloves available for me. It was a competition just to get gloves so when I got to be around bantam age, I stopped worrying about playing goal and finished my minor hockey days playing out. I decided to play goal again as an adult and had to relearn a lot of these things and did a lot of the stuff I listed earlier in the post. Skating wasn't a problem because I had been referring the entire time but the goalie skates WERE. The good thing about being a goalie as an adult is that you get to choose when you play more often; a lot of adult teams need fill in goalies. I was in a car accident 2 years ago and had nerve damage to my arm. So I dont play on a team consistently since my whiplash will sometimes randomly tell me "you arent doing anything physical these days" but i still have fun playing pickup and the odd game. The great thing about pickup is no big deal if a goal goes in, its just fun.

leeaf83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2011, 10:32 PM
  #3
Thepandamancan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 232
vCash: 500
I'm 24 and just started playing so I know the feeling.

People will probably disagree with me on this, but try and find a goalie coach/clinic/class to take. I started playing in January and relied on some natural ability and just basic knowledge of the game. Then I took a goalie class this past month and I improved leaps and bounds. If anything, it's good to prevent a lot of bad habits that you'll develop cause you don't know any better.

As for flexibility and movements, when you finally get your pads...lay one down and do A LOT of butterfly drops on it. You could also get by with a huge pillow or something I guess (I use a bosu ball). Doesn't have to be fast, just do it enough so your muscles get used to it. When you get used to it, make sure your form is right. Here's a video of it and try watching his other videos cause they're very informative.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7i21HG8GwU

Thepandamancan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2011, 10:56 PM
  #4
Jaromir Jagrbombs
Registered User
 
Jaromir Jagrbombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ottawa, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 482
vCash: 500
Awesome, thanks for the great posts guys! Much appreciated.

My buddy is in the same position as me, just learning how to play now and he wants to get a beer league team going this winter with some of my more talented friends lol.

I think I will start by playing wing, that was a good idea that I didn't really think of yet it makes a ton of sense.


Last edited by Jaromir Jagrbombs: 06-12-2011 at 11:04 PM.
Jaromir Jagrbombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2011, 11:58 PM
  #5
Giroux tha Damaja
Registered User
 
Giroux tha Damaja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Mount Holly, NJ
Country: United States
Posts: 9,232
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Giroux tha Damaja
You're best bet IMO, is to pick up "The Hockey Goalie's Handbook" by Jim Corsi. It gives you a great grasp on what things all good goalies have in common, regardless of style. Then I would pick up "Hockey Goaltending" by Brian Daccord. I would get this mostly for the DVD that comes with it. It will show you some basic, efficient movements to use in net to recover and makes saves. This set of techniques will be easy for the new goaltender, but not something that will form habits that you will need to break once you improve and expend your skills.

Other than that, stretch a lot, jogging, squats, dead lifts and core work will all go along way to making you a faster goalie. The number one thing you can do to improve though is play. Just play as much hockey as you can. The less you think and the more certain decisions become second nature to you on the ice, the smoother and more efficient you become and the easier the saves get.

Good luck and have lots of fun.

Giroux tha Damaja is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-13-2011, 05:43 AM
  #6
Gino 14
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 812
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaromir Jagr Bombs View Post
I think I will start by playing wing, that was a good idea that I didn't really think of yet it makes a ton of sense.
I'm really not sure that this is a good idea, it's going to do little to help. Your best bet is to get in net as often as you can, skate whenever you get the opportunity, and avoid bulking up unless you have a trainer that knows how to get you there without loosing flexibility.

Gino 14 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-13-2011, 02:06 PM
  #7
adaminnj
Leafs out = SPRING!
 
adaminnj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Pickering ON & N-NJ
Country: Canada
Posts: 667
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
I'm really not sure that this is a good idea, it's going to do little to help. Your best bet is to get in net as often as you can, skate whenever you get the opportunity, and avoid bulking up unless you have a trainer that knows how to get you there without loosing flexibility.

Yeah playing out is not going to help your skating in net. I do both and if I go to long w/o playing wing or playing net I have a learning curve to get back into the grove of playing either position. the skates are so different and goal skates are more like sled runners as compared to my player skates. I was buying player skates for my son to skate recreationally with his friends or with school trips but he no longer gets player skates because of the big difference.

I hate playing net but this year in the beginner league I keep hearing that I'm improving and I'm only skating net even at shinny.

Good luck what ever you do.

adaminnj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2011, 11:44 AM
  #8
fortinbras
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 6
vCash: 500
I'm 27 and am thinking of trying to learn to play goalie as well. I'm just getting back into the game and still play out, but some of the lower leagues and pickup sessions are lacking in goalies, and goalies often get to play for free...

Quote:
and avoid bulking up unless you have a trainer that knows how to get you there without loosing flexibility.
This is definitely true! I used to be pretty flexible, even though I wasn't in the greatest shape. Years later, after the Army and lots of gym time, I'm in great shape, but I've found my flexibility has gone to the pits. It became especially apparent because I'm also getting back into martial arts; I am hoping the stretching exercises I'm starting will help my hockey as well. That's part of the reason I want to try goalie, though, I'll probably just end up tearing my groin!

Good luck learning the position.

fortinbras is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2011, 05:47 PM
  #9
GrizzWinter31
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: New England
Country: United States
Posts: 12
vCash: 500
A) Just watch professional, collegiate, and junior goalies to get an idea. There are some books you could pick up (I don't know any specifically). Youtube videos can help out. Check out the Corey Wogtech videos.
However, I would HIGHLY recommend going to a goalie camp if not getting a goalie coach if you can afford it.

B) Yoga is great. It is good flexibility and it is about controlling your movements which really engages your core. Having a strong core is the foundation for your movement. Plus yoga is good for all aspects of athleticism. And I do highly recommend the P90x yoga.

If you want to hit the gym..Core and legs are essential.

C) As for pads..I would recommend looking into used pads that at one time were top of the line and made in Canada.
Vaughn Velocity 2's, Reebok Premier 2's, Itech 12.8s, Itech Prodigy 9.8, etc.
Most pad companies make lower end pads, but they are made in China and don't last very long. You could get those at the same price as some used pads, but it just isn't worth it.

D) Just have fun. I love everything to do with the position.

Don't get discouraged with goals..They happen to every goalie.
It is normal to have days where you can't stop anything.

GrizzWinter31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2011, 08:45 PM
  #10
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,310
vCash: 500
Really the only way you can learn to play goal is to play goal. Other than that, work on your backwards skating, work on sliding from side to side and work on getting down to your knees and then getting back up quickly.
Finding a goalie clinic might be tough but luckyily most open hockey leagues are free for goalies, so you should have no problem finding ice time.

Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2011, 11:09 PM
  #11
Jaromir Jagrbombs
Registered User
 
Jaromir Jagrbombs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Ottawa, ON
Country: Canada
Posts: 482
vCash: 500
thanks for all the input. yeah I'm gonna start going to the local rink hopefully once a week to work on my skating... and I know a girl who plays competitive who is a goalie and she agreed to take me under her wing once I get my skating up to par/have the equipment . gonna head to Chapters too and try to pick up those books that Giroux recommended.

playing hockey (and specifically goalie) has always been something I've wanted to do but never really had the opportunity, and I'm definitely looking forward to the challenge!

Jaromir Jagrbombs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:50 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.