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06-25-2011, 08:47 PM
  #1
HamiltonOHL
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Question about Day 2 draft selections

Did GMCF and Co think that the college core was stronger then the european and Major Junior group because we only took 1 CHL player and the rest HS kids on day two

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06-25-2011, 09:14 PM
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I think if you look at Flahr's time in Ottawa he did tend to stay away from the CHL much more often than TT/DR did in their time here. Brodin being the only European somewhat surprised me. Taking 2 Minnesotans I think had to be anticipated.

The high school/USHL/Cdn junior A programs that lead players to college give an organization more time to evaluate them than the CHL. You're looking at 4, 5 years after being drafted before having to give up on them, whereas a CHLer its 2 years. The CHL does have its advantages though, as the travel/schedule is much more difficult, getting a player ready for the 80/82 game pro seasons in North America.

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06-26-2011, 12:13 AM
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bozak911
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plus, there's this aspect of taking high school / college bound kids.

The rules are different than if they were in a CHL program.

It may make business sense, as saywut alluded to...

Example; You draft a CHL player who is eligible to go back to junior as an over ager. They are drafted at 18 and go back for their 19th year. By the time they are 20, they need a contract from the parent club.

The parent club can only have 50 contracts. There are such things as professional try outs, amateur try outs, etcetera. The ECHL contracts are separate.

So by the time that a CHL draftee is 20, they need a contract, which eats a spot out of the 50.

College kids or those that have committed to NCAA programs have different rules.

A kid that just graduated high school doesn't have to enter college right away. They can spend a year in either USHL Junior A or USHL Junior B. This eats up their age 19 year. Then, they can enter a competitive NCAA program at 19/20, depending on how early or late in the year they are born.

A college commitment can be extended to five years.

Hypothetically, if a high school kid that was just drafted turns 19 in August, they spend a year in a USHL Junior A program. They enter their college commitment the following fall being age 20.

Here are a few scenarios;
Their development sky rockets. They spend 2 years in their college commitment. They now need a contract at age 22.
Their development is on pace, but when they are a junior, the parent club thinks that they are ready to contribute to either club. They now need a contract at age 23.
Their development is a little slower, go fully through their senior year. They now need a contract at age 24.
OR
The parent club wants to extend them out a year to keep them in the pipeline. They know that a veteran contract is coming off the books the following year and this kid is ready. They can extend the college commitment to 5 years. They now need a contract at 25.

This is one of the reasons why their is an age limit to the various types of RFA statuses.

So it's not exactly a matter of which league is better. It's pretty much a consensus that the CHL leagues are more like the AHL/NHL schedules than the NCAA, and the speed of those games are closer to the AHL level than college.

From a business perspective, if you are truly filling your pipeline, the college commitment kids are better for that pipeline. Competitive hockey, NCAA kids can (and do) enter elite leagues during college off seasons. These elite leagues have way more of an intense schedule than the NCAA.

Basically, things have changed quite a bit from the NCAA perspective. Kids get a full on education, but there is often a HUGE ice time advantage when coupled with the elite leagues. The NCAA season used to be one and done and no more structured ice.

I'm pretty good friends with a guy whose kid just went through weighing the options of the junior or USHL/NCAA route. His kid was a D-man for the state champ Eden Prairie team. It's unfortunate that he decided to just bail altogether on pursuing hockey and ended up with a scholarship and acceptance to an Ivy league pre-law program.

lol

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06-26-2011, 12:49 AM
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I think it comes down to the fact that they're taking safe picks and they're showing that they will let their prospects develop.

The CHL is the best developmental league is the world for junior aged kids. But let's face it the NCAA is better suited for more raw players who have more holes in their game. The NCAA allows for lots of practice time but the schedule isn't as rigorous therefore the kid's going to have a harder time jumping straight to the pros and keeping his consistency.

I think it depends on the player and I think tha CF and co really feel confident in the way the NCAA does it, and given our lack of success with CHL prospects I can see why.

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06-26-2011, 05:24 AM
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HamiltonOHL
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the only downside of the NCAA route that i have is the amount of games they play.. You play 72-70 games in Major juniors compated to what 34 in NCAA... also they don't have much NCAA coverage up here in canada like they do down in the states otherwise i wouldnt have a problem with college players

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06-26-2011, 10:47 AM
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A team that goes all the way to the memorial cup ends up playing close to 100 games. An NCAA team that goes to the national championship doesn't even play half the amount of games. The number of games was way too low.

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06-26-2011, 11:31 AM
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I don't necessarily believe that playing a large number of games and having a professional-like travel schedule is all that great for development.

The point totals look attractive, but I don't see a whole lot of development or believe Junior hockey players spend as extensive time correcting fundamental flaws or physical shortcomings as players in the NCAA do.

There's no perfect route to the NHL in my opinion. What works for one prospect doesn't for another.

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06-26-2011, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HockeyFan850 View Post
the only downside of the NCAA route that i have is the amount of games they play.. You play 72-70 games in Major juniors compated to what 34 in NCAA... also they don't have much NCAA coverage up here in canada like they do down in the states otherwise i wouldnt have a problem with college players
I'll have to ask about the "elite leagues" and where they pick up before and after the college season.

As I understand it, the smaller number of games for NCAA isn't really a detraction now with the supplemental leagues.

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06-26-2011, 06:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bozak911 View Post
I'll have to ask about the "elite leagues" and where they pick up before and after the college season.

As I understand it, the smaller number of games for NCAA isn't really a detraction now with the supplemental leagues.
"elite leagues" are for high school players. NCAA players dont play in any other "organized" leagues outside of maybe some of the international IIHF stuff.

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06-26-2011, 06:31 PM
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Bookman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by this providence View Post
I don't necessarily believe that playing a large number of games and having a professional-like travel schedule is all that great for development.

The point totals look attractive, but I don't see a whole lot of development or believe Junior hockey players spend as extensive time correcting fundamental flaws or physical shortcomings as players in the NCAA do.

There's no perfect route to the NHL in my opinion. What works for one prospect doesn't for another.
Once again, words of wisdom this providence, words of wisdom.

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06-26-2011, 06:42 PM
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Surprised no WHL kids. Wild love their WHL kids

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