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Takeaway leaders in the NHL...

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Old
07-20-2011, 04:21 PM
  #1
steveat
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Takeaway leaders in the NHL...

I found an interesting article on TSN... Would this be a reflection of what's to come? Could someone help me to understand if last season was reflective of this or were the Isles statisticians being generous?

http://tsn.ca/nhl/story/?id=372128

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07-20-2011, 04:24 PM
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Renbarg
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These stats are all subjective. There is no rhyme or reason to them.

Islanders are notoriously generous in all of these subjective stats and probably more so for the home team guys.

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07-20-2011, 04:43 PM
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mitchy22
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The issue I have with Takeaways as a stat is that you actually only gain opportunities for a takeaway when your team doesn't have the puck.

Because of this, it's hard to use the stat to tell the difference between players that truly have the ability to take away the puck with those that have more opportunities to take away the puck because their line/team isn't in possession of it as often.

My biggest issue with the Moulson-JT-PAP line is actually when they lose possession and all or part of the line is then forced into harsh minutes in their own end. (This is also where I tell people to look for PAP exiting the ice as the last player out of the offensive zone.)

Centers don't tend to get that luxury to leave the ice. There's a reason why centers dominate the list. 1.) They are always supposed to be the most responsible forward in coming back to break up plays. 2.) They most often get stuck out on the ice without possession.

As with many stats, you have to actually take these within the context of the game. A takeaway when your team is running around in its own zone is a huge play, but it's not something you want to see happening too often. Offensive takeaways are good, but we all know the most important stats are the ones you get after the takeaway.

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Mitch

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07-20-2011, 05:25 PM
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Fork
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whats more amazing is that grabner is the second best even strength scorer, only behind crosby!

http://www.tsn.ca/nhl/story/?id=371987

and it doesnt even take into account short handed goals, of which grabner has 6

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07-20-2011, 06:12 PM
  #5
BigTuna49
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Takeaways are just way too subjective. I wish they weren't but they are.

Btw, I'm Back!!!

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Old
07-21-2011, 10:43 AM
  #6
islandersfreak21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitchy22 View Post
The issue I have with Takeaways as a stat is that you actually only gain opportunities for a takeaway when your team doesn't have the puck.

Because of this, it's hard to use the stat to tell the difference between players that truly have the ability to take away the puck with those that have more opportunities to take away the puck because their line/team isn't in possession of it as often.

My biggest issue with the Moulson-JT-PAP line is actually when they lose possession and all or part of the line is then forced into harsh minutes in their own end. (This is also where I tell people to look for PAP exiting the ice as the last player out of the offensive zone.)

Centers don't tend to get that luxury to leave the ice. There's a reason why centers dominate the list. 1.) They are always supposed to be the most responsible forward in coming back to break up plays. 2.) They most often get stuck out on the ice without possession.

As with many stats, you have to actually take these within the context of the game. A takeaway when your team is running around in its own zone is a huge play, but it's not something you want to see happening too often. Offensive takeaways are good, but we all know the most important stats are the ones you get after the takeaway.

,
Mitch
this

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Old
07-21-2011, 10:48 PM
  #7
BelovedIsles
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I think what this may suggest about the Isles is that A) They have a few pretty adroit takeaway artists (e.g. Marty, AMac, JT, Franz). B) Time of possession is not favoring the Isles, therefore, they are playing more time in their zone, and chasing the puck greater amounts of time. Case in point, the Bruin's have 5 D men in the bottom 25, in part b/c they are a great puck possession team.

As an addendum, if KO played a full year he'd be in the top-25 for forwards.

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