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MLD 2011 Draft Thread II

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Old
07-29-2011, 02:23 PM
  #201
BenchBrawl
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what do you guys think about langkow , isn't he a bit underrated?

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07-29-2011, 02:42 PM
  #202
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Yeah Dreakmur the fact that you're worried about someone on a message boards character says a lot about yours in my opinion too.

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07-29-2011, 02:45 PM
  #203
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As far as Langkow Reen, he's consistent offensively and solid defensively. I think there is one better modern pick at center for a third or fourth line, but Langkow does belong here too. It's a fine pick. Don't think he's overrated or underrated.

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07-29-2011, 02:45 PM
  #204
Dreakmur
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Originally Posted by vecens24 View Post
Yeah Dreakmur the fact that you're worried about someone on a message boards character says a lot about yours in my opinion too.
If this same post was made to or about a moderator, it would be grounds for an infraction, would it not?


Last edited by Dreakmur: 07-29-2011 at 09:11 PM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 02:48 PM
  #205
TheDevilMadeMe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
what do you guys think about langkow , isn't he a bit underrated?
I think he's a solid two-way guy here. Nothing all that special but solid. I honestly thought he was drafted already, but I must have gotten him mixed up with Conroy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
I'd disagree with you, but, apparently, that's against the forum rules.

Dont worry... i'll be getting banned in a few minutes....
This is hopefully the last I'll comment on the matter, but it really worth it?

You obviously think the Doughty fiasco was stupid and somehow hurt the integrity of the draft.

I think it was completely unnecessary because apparently 70s was the only one aware that he wasn't eligible to be drafted. I didn't specifically object to it because I figured that it would have zero actual impact on the draft, since if Doughty was actually coveted that much by anyone, he would have been drafted when nobody was aware of the "300 games" rule. But because nobody had actually wanted Doughty until 70s brought him up, I figured it wouldn't hurt the integrity of the draft for that reason.

Yeah, in retrospect, it was completely unnecessary, as the only GM who put in a serious bid (Billy) just used it as a do-over for a guy he didn't want anymore after researching him. But I really don't see it as anything worse than a minor distraction.

I had no problem with the 300 games rule, I kind of liked it actually, as I really don't feel we can get a good sense of how good a guy is when he's only played 3 seasons. But the majority of GMs apparently didn't like the rule. See it as removing a failed rule on the fly, like the NHL did with the "foot in the crease" in the 1999 finals...


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-01-2011 at 11:23 AM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 03:01 PM
  #206
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Originally Posted by DaveG View Post
The biggest reason the Oilers lost isn't the loss of Roloson, it's the fact that they couldn't score on Ward in their losses. Aside from Game 1, they had a grand total of 2 goals against Ward in the games they lost. So unless you honestly believe that Roloson would have post shutouts in at least one those games, there's no way the Oilers were winning it. I'm honestly getting absolutely sick of people saying "if Roloson" like it's an absolute certainty. Really the way Markkanen play those games up in Edmonton in that series it just as easily could have wound up being a Canes sweep.
Didn't mean to strike a nerve. But I do believe that very thing you suggest, since I said "I believe Edmonton having a hot goalie of their own to match Cam Ward could've/would've made the difference in the series."

Besides, if game one goes differently than it did then the whole rest of the series might've been changed. It's a moot point, though. It's like me saying "If Rashard Mendenhall didn't fumble in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl..." we'll never know.

For the record, I'm not trying to take anything away from the Hurricanes' championship. They won the games, they earned the cup. It's value is not lessened in my eyes due to Roloson not being in goal. I just think he'd have been the difference for the Oilers if he had played.

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07-29-2011, 03:07 PM
  #207
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
You obviously think the Doughty fiasco was stupid and somehow hurt the integrity of the draft.
I think it was stupid and pointless.

Seventies' reaction to my opposition was what pissed me off. As I said to some administrator that PMed me, if you're not allowed to disagree with moderators, then moderators shouldn't be allowed to post in threads where disagreements happen, and they certainly shouldn't antgonize other posters.

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07-29-2011, 03:21 PM
  #208
DaveG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Selfish Man View Post
Didn't mean to strike a nerve. But I do believe that very thing you suggest, since I said "I believe Edmonton having a hot goalie of their own to match Cam Ward could've/would've made the difference in the series."

Besides, if game one goes differently than it did then the whole rest of the series might've been changed. It's a moot point, though. It's like me saying "If Rashard Mendenhall didn't fumble in the 4th quarter of the Super Bowl..." we'll never know.

For the record, I'm not trying to take anything away from the Hurricanes' championship. They won the games, they earned the cup. It's value is not lessened in my eyes due to Roloson not being in goal. I just think he'd have been the difference for the Oilers if he had played.
Fair enough. As you can imagine it's one of those things that I've heard over and over enough over the last 5 years, and almost always in a context of people detracting from that cup, that it's become a bit of an instantaneous assumption anymore when I see the point made.

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Old
07-29-2011, 03:40 PM
  #209
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With #220 the Sleepwatchers will take Steve Rucchin.

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07-29-2011, 05:07 PM
  #210
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This is a novelty, but I swear I'm not doing it for that reason.

To play next to Billy Harris on the 3rd line, I select... Billy Harris!

They are two completely different players whose career spans almost overlapped. they are not related.

Billy Harris was a RW drafted 1st overall by the NY Islanders in 1972. While he of course never lived up to that billing, he was a very solid player for 897 NHL games:

- He scored 558 career points, an average of 0.45 adjusted ESPPG in his career
- He was described as a big bodied guy (6'2", 195 lbs in the 70s) who used his size well... although I don't see him as a bruiser.
- He killed 22% of penalties for his teams in his career
- He got into one ASG in his career
- He has one of the longest ironman streaks of all-time, spanning over 7 full seasons.
- He placed 11th in Selke voting in 1977, the first year of the award's existence, with 7 voting points.
- With a "6-best" percentages score of 323, he has one of the better offensive peaks among post-expansion wingers available. To translate that into real points, that's eight seasons with 49+ points and four with 60+.
- He was an important cog to teams that were generally strong.
- He was 7th in scoring in the 1977 playoffs with 14 points.
- He and Dave Lewis were packaged to get Butch Goring, a player of much higher offensive and defensive value.

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Old
07-29-2011, 05:16 PM
  #211
seventieslord
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Next, we select our 4th line RW and 2nd unit PK specialist, a guy I took 200 picks later last draft, Mike Grier. I'll just paste in what I wrote last year for now, as not much has changed.

Quote:
Was maybe the best defensive forward remaining. Just passed 1000 games in the NHL. Players who got any real selke recognition are rare right now, but Grier was 14th in voting in 2008, receiving 13 votes. His career adjusted -86 is a badge of honour, showing that he played often against the opposition's best players. Having killed 39% of penalties for teams that allowed 9% less than the league average for 1000 games, Grier is likely the most accomplished penalty killer remaining. Among the guys I think are the top-10 on that list, Grier's 0.39 adjusted ESPPG is the 2nd highest behind a guy with 0.41; the others range from 0.21 to 0.38. Grier is always in the top-4 on his team in hits and has averaged about 1.1 giveaways per takeaway, a very strong ratio in a league where approximately 1.8 giveaways per takeaway are logged. Despite his very physical play, Grier takes a minor penalty approximately once every six games. In 13 seasons, he's been in 10 playoffs, to the 2nd round 5 times, and to the 3rd round once. I was critical of Grier as an MLD player picked in the 800s in MLDs 8, 9, and 10, but at 1435, the guy's a major steal. A highly efficient, useful, and unsung player. ""an aggressive forechecker who bores in on the unfortunate puck carrier with all the intensity of a lineman blitzing a quarterback... frightens a lot of people into mistakes..."
Grier also satisfies our team's needs for a player who started in 1995-2004 or for a player who played in 2011.

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07-29-2011, 05:21 PM
  #212
seventieslord
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Interesting note about Red Green and Shorty Green: 1925 Hart Voting:

9. Shorty Green (28)
14. Red Green (8)

I had previously said that their best seasons, 1925, were about equal... not so sure about that now.

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07-29-2011, 07:32 PM
  #213
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Thunder Bay Twins select:


D Pierre Bouchard

The son of legendary Emile "Butch" Bouchard, Pierre Bouchard was able to carve out his own NHL legacy, much of which was with the same club his father led to four Stanley Cups. But Pierre was able to outdo his father and helped the Habs capture five Cup championships.

Pierre Bouchard, much like a chip off the old block, was a big, stay at home defensemen who was a key part to the Montreal teams of the Disco Decade, though his style of play didn't earn him the accolades from the fans and media that so many others received. The ultimate team player, Pierre's coaches and teammates all appreciated his sacrificial contributions.


D Ted Graham

Defenceman Ted Graham played over 300 NHL games for six different franchises in the 20s and 30s. He was a reliable player in his own end and passed the puck to his forwards efficiently. (more info to follow)

C Brendan Morrison

...The young pivot scored 54 points and was solid at both ends of the ice while helping the Canucks reach the playoffs.

An important two-way player with the Canucks, Morrison's speed and anticipation landed him significant time on both specialty units. Since his arrival in Vancouver, Morrison has been one of the team's more durable and consistent players, establishing career highs in goals (25), assists (46) and points (71) during the 2002-03 season.

After a 60-point 2003-04 season in Vancouver, Morrison competed overseas with Linkopings HC in Sweden during the NHL lockout. He returned in 2005-06 and played his fifth consecutive 82 game season, extending his ironman streak to 512 consecutive games.


F Tim Hunter

Hunter was known as GM TheJudge's favorite player when he was 4.

Tim Hunter only scored 138 points in over 800 NHL games, but was a player every team in the NHL would have killed to have.

"I was a player with not a lot of talent but came to play every night and played very hard, hated to lose and loved the game and loved to win."

Tim had no measurable finesse skill to speak of. He was at best an average skater. He had no speed or agility on skates but had excellent balance, which aided him in the physical game. He could do little with the puck in terms of shooting, passing or handling. Most of his goals came by crashing the crease or accidentally deflecting off his shin guard.

While Tim lacked the skills to do the finesse game, he excelled at the physical game. He was as big and strong as they come. He did some good work along the boards and in front of the net. And of course Tim was a willing and good fighter, and occasionally would use his lumber in a not so legal manner.

Tim had a small and well defined role on the ice, but it is impossible to over exaggerate the importance of his contributions off of it. He was a great team player - excellent in the dressing rooms. The Calgary Flames became a powerhouse in the 1980s, and Tim's fingerprints are all over that. His wit, humor, support and leadership helped to mold a group of individuals into a top flight team. It is Tim's off ice contributions that were the most important contribution he made to his hockey team.


Last edited by TheJudge: 07-29-2011 at 07:37 PM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 07:35 PM
  #214
Dreakmur
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I've been convinced that I should just finish the draft and take a break after.... which I will do.


Forbes Kennedy and Ken Schinkel

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Old
07-29-2011, 07:52 PM
  #215
seventieslord
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ugh, this is actually pretty tough because it will be about 60 picks before I pick again!

Regina selects:

John Mayasich, C/D

Mayasich will most likely be a spare, but I think he's a very good one worth taking a bit earlier. He was a high-scoring US college player who proved in international play (in the 60s) that he could compete with the European nations. He was named the best D-man at the 1960 worlds. While that doesn't make him an excellent MLD D-man, I think it shows the capability to step in, in case of an injury to Sargent.

and:

Darcy Tucker, F

This is the latest Tucker has ever been selected... and he deserved to fall a lot, and I'm happy to get him at a bit of a discount now. Tucker was a rather unique player with the ability to score (6 best seasons are 287% total), fight middleweights (101 NHL fights), kill penalties (18%), forecheck like a demon, make some awesome open-ice hits, and contribute on the PP. he also played all three forward positions for a minimum of three seasons each. He gives us the exact type of skillset one wants out of a 4th-liner while giving us some flexibility (can be LW or C) for our next block of picks because I really have no idea who will be left for us by then.

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07-29-2011, 08:09 PM
  #216
TheDevilMadeMe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
wasnt tucker selected in the ATD ? I swear I remember a conversation about him and corson...might just be in my head

edit: well i guess he wasnt selected
I think there was a conversation about Tucker and Corson when people were trying to talk about Corson not exactly being a character guy...

Tucker was probably mentioned by name in either the lineup assassination or playoffs, which is fine, the undrafted rule is only in effect while we are actively drafting.

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Old
07-29-2011, 08:39 PM
  #217
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
This is hopefully the last I'll comment on the matter, but it really worth it?

You obviously think the Doughty fiasco was stupid and somehow hurt the integrity of the draft.

I think it was completely unnecessary because apparently 70s was the only one aware that he wasn't eligible to be drafted. I didn't specifically object to it because I figured that it would have zero actual impact on the draft, since if Doughty was actually coveted that much by anyone, he would have been drafted when nobody was aware of the "300 games" rule. But because nobody had actually wanted Doughty until 70s brought him up, I figured it wouldn't hurt the integrity of the draft for that reason.

Yeah, in retrospect, it was completely unnecessary, as the only GM who put in a serious bid (Billy) just used it as a do-over for a guy he didn't want anymore after researching him. But I really don't see it as anything worse than a minor distraction.

I had no problem with the 300 games rule, I kind of liked it actually, as I really don't feel we can get a good sense of how good a guy is when he's only played 3 seasons. But the majority of GMs apparently didn't like the rule. See it as removing a failed rule on the fly, like the NHL did with the "foot in the crease" in the 1999 finals...
I knew about the 300 games rule, just putting it out there.

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Old
07-29-2011, 09:11 PM
  #218
chaosrevolver
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Belleville Bulls will select two coaches:

First, a picture of excellence behind the bench for the Dallas Blackhawks winning several championships. Most notably, he also made the finals twice as the Jets coach including winning a title.

Coach - Bobby Kromm

My second pick was also a picture of excellence, but for the Ottawa 67's. Pretty sure everyone knows him if you are from Canada. The 4x OHA Coach of the Year and HHOF member has over 1000 wins and only had 6 losing seasons in the OHL (over a 35 year span) which is incredible in junior hockey.

Coach - Brian Kilrea

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07-29-2011, 09:33 PM
  #219
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With my 1st pick, I'll take C/RW Mark Johnson



1x NHL All Star Game Participant
1980 Olympic Gold Medalist
Hartford Whalers Captain, 1983-85
United States Hockey Hall of Fame Member
IIHF Hockey Hall of Fame Member
SH TOI/G(80-87, excluding 83-85): 3, 4, 1, 5, 1
Leading scorer of US 1980 Olympic Team
26th in points, 1983-84
29th in assists, 1983-84

Quote:
Under the guidance of his famous father, he enjoyed three outstanding years at the University of Wisconsin. He racked up 256 points over those years and was twice selected to the Western Collegiate Hockey Association All-Star Team after leading the conference in goals. His relative lack of size caused many teams to avoid drafting him, but the Pittsburgh Penguins selected him 66th overall at the 1977 Amateur Draft with the hope that he would mature in college and gain valuable international experience wearing the colors of the United States.

He played well for the U.S. at the 1978 and 1979 World Championships before committing to the national team as it prepared for the Lake Placid Olympics. Then Johnson proved to be one of the top players during Team USA's Miracle on Ice gold medal win in 1980. He scored 11 points in seven matches and was a respected figure in the dressing room. His two biggest goals came in the 4-3 upset over the USSR that paved the way to the gold medal.

After the Games, Johnson joined the Penguins for the last 17 regular-season games and first round of the playoffs. His acquisition brought the team some badly needed headlines in a city where the sports pages were dominated by the Steelers in football and the Pirates in baseball. He played solidly and proved he could stand the pace of the NHL game. As a rookie in 1980-81, he scored 33 points on a weak Pittsburgh squad and then represented the U.S. at the World Championship in the spring and the Canada Cup in the fall. Halfway through the 1981-82 season, he was traded to Minnesota. Following the North Stars' early exit from the playoffs at the hands of Chicago, Johnson again represented his country at the World Championship.

His career took a turn for the better when he was sent to Hartford in a deal consummated at the NHL Entry Draft. The Whalers utilized his speed and offensive savvy in a way that allowed him to play his best hockey as a professional. He was often teamed with xxx and xxx and produced consecutive 30-goal seasons in 1982-83 and 1983-84. In 1984, after a 35 goal season, he was named the Whalers' most valuable player. As William Houston noted, "It took him a while to learn the little tricks needed to make a small man effective in the rough NHL when to drive for the net, when to be aggressive and when to back off to save energy."

A popular player wherever he went, Johnson totaled 508 NHL points. He was often deployed on both the power-play and the penalty-killing units and was always highly regarded for his on ice intelligence. And his performance at Lake Placid in 1980 made him one of the heroes of U.S. hockey to a whole generation of fans.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13116

Quote:
His son Mark will become perhaps the greatest college hockey player ever, as well as Olympic hero and NHL star. But in the meantime all he wants for Christmas is a Soviet Union hockey jersey, preferably Vladimir Petrov.

Yes, that's correct. The son of an hockey legend and very much an American hockey legend in his own right grew up idolizing the Soviets. I don't think dad could have been any happier.

Mark Johnson emulated the Soviet game perfectly, playing a beautiful brand of hockey based on skill, skating and passing. His teammates called him "Magic," because the things he could do with the puck and the plays he could create with his wondrous passing ability made some think he was hockey's equivalent to NBA star Magic Johnson.

"He was our Gretzky," said Olympic teammate Jim Craig.

He was good. He led Madison Memorial to the 1976 Wisconsin High School championship in 1976, but he almost missed much of his final year of secondary schooling because some felt the 17 year old was ready for the 1976 Olympic team. After scoring 11 points in 11 exhibition games, he ultimately was not considered for the team as his father, who was coaching Team USA at the Innsbruck Games, feared charges of nepotism.

Father and son would unite the next season at the University of Wisconsin where both will forever be legends. In Mark's freshman year he led the Badgers to the NCAA championship. Mark, who scored 36 goals and 80 points in 40 games, scored 2 goals and 3 points in the title game against Michigan.

Johnson would complete three seasons at Wisconsin, completing his Bachelor of Science in kinesiology in 1994 after his hockey career ended. But in the 1979-80 season the Americans would not leave their top collegian off their Olympic team this time around, especially since the games were to be played in Lake Placid, New York. Not even the fact that Herb Brooks, Bob Johnson's fierce rival and downright bitter enemy, was coaching the team could keep Mark Johnson off this team. He was too good. Without him, Team USA had no hope of any hockey glory in 1980.

Johnson led all Team USA players in pre-Olympic scoring, with 33 goals, 48 assists and 81 points, and then led the Americans in Olympic scoring with 11 points. Though Mike Eruzione scored the famous game winning goal against the Soviets, it was Johnson who scored two keys against the mighty Russians. His first goal tied the game at 2-2 with just one second left in the first period, and his second goal tied the game at 3-3 midway through the third period, setting the stage for Eruzione's game-winner. Johnson then went on to score the game-winning goal in team's 4-2 win over Finland to give the Americans the 1980 Olympic gold medal!

Following the Olympics Johnson moved on to the NHL, joining the Pittsburgh Penguins who drafted him 66th overall back in 1977. He would go on to be Pittsburgh's rookie of the year in 1980-81, but he never could get established in the Steel City. His small size and international game put him at a disadvantage in the rough and tumble world of the NHL. He would have to adjust his game if he were to succeed in the NHL.

Adjust he did, and succeed he did. After a short 10 game stint with the Minnesota North Stars, Johnson joined the Hartford Whalers in 1982. It was with the Whalers he is best remembered as a pro, playing on a line with xxx and xxx. In his first year he exploded for 31 goals and 69 points, and then set career highs in 1983-84 with 35 goals and 87 points. That year he was even invited to the NHL All Star game, where he tied an All Star game record (since broke) with 3 assists.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...k-johnson.html

Quote:
It ended at last, and Brooks had the players coast slowly around the rink so that the lactic acid could work itself out of their muscles. And that was when Forward Mark Johnson broke his stick over the boards. Mark Johnson, who made the team go. Mark Johnson, who was its hardest worker, its smartest player.

Brooks treated Johnson differently, too. Johnson is a competitor, one of those rare players who find the puck on their stick all night long. He is absolutely dedicated to hockey, and was dedicated to the team—a leader by example. Yet, until September, Johnson had no idea where he stood. No one did—Brooks had an ax over everyone's head. But Brooks took Johnson aside shortly after the Skate Till You Die episode and told him, "You're the guy who's going to make or break us. When you're really playing, our whole team gets better."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...4069/index.htm

Quote:
Johnson, busting toward the net, weaved through the two Soviet defensemen and picked up the puck. He feinted, dropping his shoulder as if to shoot, and Tretiak went to his knees. Johnson pulled the puck back, moved to his left a bit and slid the puck behind Tretiak and into the net just before time expired.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...14/4/index.htm

Quote:
Wisconsin's spectacular center Mark Johnson, future hero of the 1980 Olympic team
http://books.google.com/books?id=SJC...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Enter Mark Johnson, son of coaching legend Badger Bob Johnson and a player all considered the most talented scorer of the bunch.
http://books.google.com/books?id=gO7...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Brooks was most impressed by the skill of three players who had given his Gophers fits so many problems over the years: Mark Johnson of University of Wisconsin, xxx of University of Minnesota-Duluth, and Dave Christian of the University of North Dakota.

Of the three, Johnson was the most refined, and was so smooth when he beat you, it was almost painless.
http://books.google.com/books?id=n87...hockey&f=false

Quote:
Despite his size, Johnson proved his ability to stand up to a check during the Games. He assisted on the winning goal in the gold medal clinching victory over Finland when he outmuscled a Finnish defenseman behind the net and put a perfect pass on the stick of xxx.

"He's not big, but he's got hockey smarts," Bastien said. "I've seen him five times and every time he had the knack for making the big play."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Mark Johnson, a former University of Wisconsin hockey star who now plays for the Pittsburgh Penguins of the NHL, apparently thrives on pressure.

But Tuesday night Johnson, who has earned the nickname "Magic" from his teammates, scored twice as the Penguins defeated the Boston Bruins in Boston, 4-2, in the first game in the best of five first round playoff series.

"Mark Johnson has been a big plus for us," said Russ Anderson, a player for the Penguins. "He comes up with the big plays and he's a winner. He's already proven that."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Gretzky, who had only one assist and one shot on goal at that juncture, went into his patented 360-degree puck-handling spin just inside the left point. But Johnson, who more than held his own against the NHL's leading scorer earlier this season, knew Gretzky's move well.

With impeccable timing, the former Olympic hero darted behind the Oiler center, made a clean steal at top speed and was about 20 feet up ice before Gretzky had realized his pocket had been picked.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
Mark Johnson is said to weight 160 pounds, and maybe with his hockey equipment on, he does. Stronger shoulders than his have buckled under the weight of leadership, but his seem to bend with the burden.

"There's no question he makes our club go," says US coach Herb Brooks of the 22 year old center from Madison, Wisc. who played for his father, Bob, at the University of Wisconsin. "If I coached against Mark Johnson, I'd key on him."

That's what the Swedish team did Tuesday night in their 2-2 tie with the Americans. They kept sending fresh players out to cover Johnson while he skated shift after shift.

"You might see Mark get 30 or 40 percent of the ice time," said Brooks. "We have to get him the puck."


Johnson helped Tuesday by killing penalties and playing the point on the power play in addition to taking regular shifts while the team faced 1-0 and 2-1 deficits.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+hockey&hl=en

Quote:
It still wasn't quite over and things got hairy when xxx went out for tripping with less than five minutes to play. But, again short-handed, Uncle Sam's kids picked up the clincher from ever-hustling Mark Johnson, perhaps the most offensively minded of all the players.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+hockey&hl=en


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 07-31-2011 at 01:40 PM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 10:14 PM
  #220
BillyShoe1721
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C Stephane Yelle



2x Stanley Cup Champion
PK TOI Ranks on team(since stat was recorded): 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3
Top 30 PK TOI Ranks in entire NHL(since stat was recorded, 50 game minimum): 2, 10, 10, 21, 23, 24, 27

Quote:
In 1995–96, his and the Avalanche's first season in the NHL, Yelle became a regular as he played in 71 games on route to the Stanley Cup Championship. Known as an excellent faceoff taker and a gritty, hard-working player, Yelle played seven seasons for the Avalanche from 1995 to 2002, capturing another Stanley Cup in the 2000–01 season.

On October 1, 2002, prior to the 2002–03 season, Stephane was traded by the Avalanche, along with Chris Drury, to the Calgary Flames for Derek Morris, Dean McAmmond and Jeff Shantz. Yelle's transition was seamless as he established himself on the Flames checking line, helping Calgary to a 2004 Stanley Cup final appearance after a seven year playoff hiatus. Throughout his five seasons with the Flames, Yelle's versatility and defensive prowess was often highlighted as he would often fill-in as a defenseman when others were out injured.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St%C3%A9phane_Yelle

Quote:
Yelle was the Avs' third-line center for nearly seven seasons, making valuable contributions to two title teams.
http://www.denverpost.com/traffic/ci_14505851

Quote:
Stephane Yelle was a very smart player who could read the oncoming attacks with great proficiency. As such, he became one of the NHL's most knowledgeable defensive forwards in the later 1990s and in the 2000s.

His hockey smarts were his greatest asset, because the sum of his skills were average at best. He was a good skater, but lacked the speed to be much of a threat. His hand skills made him a limited player offensively. Physically he was tall and rangy, not well built to battle against the league's biggest brutes.

Yet somehow Yelle was able to use his understanding of the game of hockey combined with his hard work to become a key role player and key penalty killer with the ritzy Colorado Avalanche. He helped the Avs win championships in 1996 and 2001, and helped the Calgary Flames reach the finals in 2004. He was a very popular player with the fans and his teammates, but most especially with the coaching staffs.

Yelle is best known with the Avalanche, where he played 3rd line center in the shadows of Joe Sakic and Peter Forsberg. Yelle was more than a throw-in in the big trade that took him to Calgary. He was moved along with Chris Drury, to the Flames for Derek Morris, Dean McAmmond and Jeff Shantz.

Yelle, who also played with Boston and Carolina for short stints late in his career, retired in 2010 with 991 games played with 96 goals and 265 points. In the playoffs, where he earned his reputation as a valued NHL player, he chipped in 11 goals and 32 points in 171 post-season games. Underwhelming numbers to be sure, but his two Stanley Cup rings are far more reflective of his true worth.
http://flameslegends.blogspot.com/20...ane-yelle.html

Quote:
Yelle was traded by New Jersey to the Quebec Nordiques on June 1, 1994, and made his pro debut in the AHL with the Cornwall Aces during the 1994-95 season. In 1995-96, both he and the Nordiques franchise relocated to Colorado. The Nords became the Avalanche and Yelle became an NHL regular. Yelle played in 71 regular season games and 22 playoff games for the Avalanche in his first season en route to the Stanley Cup championship.

With the Avalanche, Yelle continued to improve on his checking and penalty killing skills. Strong on faceoffs and considered one of the premier defensive players in the league, injuries limited Yelle to 50 regular season games with Colorado in 2000-01, but he returned for the playoffs and contributed to the Avs' Stanley Cup victory at year's end. The Bourget, ON native played one more season in Colorado before being traded to the Calgary Flames prior to the 2002-03 season. Upon his arrival with the Flames, Yelle continued his strong play in his own end and was a key player in the team's drive to the 2004 Stanley Cup final.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=14947

Quote:
ASSETS: Is a good skater and gutsy shot-blocker. Has excellent anticipation when killing penalties or opposing quality centers. Provides leadership and face-off skills.
http://forecaster.thehockeynews.com/...player.cgi?836

Quote:
General manager Jim Rutherford calls Yelle "a proven winner" who "adds depth and experience to the Hurricanes at the center position."
http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=4409506

Quote:
and solid two-way centre Stephane Yelle...
http://books.google.com/books?id=kdm...0yelle&f=false

Quote:
It doesn't matter Stephane Yelle is a grizzled vet who's played in nine Game 7s in his career.

Deep inside the Calgary Flames forward is still the little child playing with friends on the pond or in the street.
http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Hockey/NHL...62365-sun.html

Quote:
Yelle, Colorado's 3rd line center and the team's best penalty killer...

"Stephane did a great job for us in killing penalties and playing a good checking role," Hunter said. "So it's going to be a big job to fill."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...ne+yelle&hl=en

Quote:
Calgary, Alberta - Stephane Yelle is something of the Zelig of the NHL. You don't notice him much. But there he is, always in the picture at this time of year.

No NHL player has been to the Western Conference finals more times in the past nine seasons than Yelle - seven. If he wins a Stanley Cup championship next month with the Calgary Flames, it will be the Ottawa native's third since joining the league in 1995-96.
http://nl.newsbank.com/nl-search/we/...ckval=GooglePM

Quote:
In return, linemates Stephane Yelle, xxx and xxx delivered in all aspects for the Calgary Flames.

The post-season race is coming down to the short strokes and the Flames' made-for-the-playoffs line provided all that could be asked of them and more in yesterday's 3-2 win over the Chicago Blackhawks.

Set the tone on the first shift? Check.

Stem the tide after the opposition scored? Check.

Kill penalties? Win faceoffs? Score the comeback-igniting goal? Check, check and -- you betcha -- check.

"They had a huge start to the game. They had a huge start to the third period and, obviously, getting the goal by them set the work ethic for our team," said Playfair as he tipped his hat to the gritty vets.

While the other elements should come as no surprise, the trio played their biggest role in the opening minute of the third period of the important contest before the announced crowd of 10,178 at the United Center.

"The best defence is when you're 200 feet from your net," Yelle said. "We worked hard down low along the boards and spent a lot of time in their end. We were trying to work it more to the net, get more shots, and knew if we stuck with it we'd get more chances. That was one of them."

"I think we've missed just that for a lot of the year, especially on the road, a line that gets it in and controls it in their end," said defenceman xxx. "It's not a lot of fancy stuff, just mucking it up, grinding it out in their zone. That goes a long way, especially in tiring out their D. Not a lot of flash there but they take a lot of pride in what they do. That line has realized how they can be successful."
http://slam.canoe.ca/Slam/Hockey/NHL...36599-sun.html

Quote:
Colorado's third line (Stephane Yelle, Mike Keane and Eric Messier) is very good at what it does...
http://m.espn.go.com/nhl/story?storyId=1384359&wjb

Quote:
Colorado Avalanche forward Stephane Yelle, one of the team's top faceoff men...
http://www.google.com/search?q=steph...w=1280&bih=838


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 07-31-2011 at 05:12 PM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 10:34 PM
  #221
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
With my 1st pick, I'll take C/RW Mark Johnson



He'll bring some scoring ability, energy, and two-way ability to my 4th line.
Is he going to play on your PP? He had a ton of PP time in his career. His career average of 34 adjusted ESP/80 GP is only three better than a guy like Mike Grier, who has played 60% more games.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
Montreal bad habits select Daymond Langkow C

and

Coach Emile Francis
Francis was, IMO, the best coach remaining.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
what do you guys think about langkow , isn't he a bit underrated?
I wouldn't say he's over or underrated. He's an OK two-way guy, but his point totals overrate him because he's rarely, if ever been the best player on his line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vecens24 View Post
As far as Langkow Reen, he's consistent offensively and solid defensively. I think there is one better modern pick at center for a third or fourth line, but Langkow does belong here too. It's a fine pick. Don't think he's overrated or underrated.
Did you mean Rucchin?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheJudge View Post
Thunder Bay Twins select:


D Pierre Bouchard

The son of legendary Emile "Butch" Bouchard, Pierre Bouchard was able to carve out his own NHL legacy, much of which was with the same club his father led to four Stanley Cups. But Pierre was able to outdo his father and helped the Habs capture five Cup championships.

Pierre Bouchard, much like a chip off the old block, was a big, stay at home defensemen who was a key part to the Montreal teams of the Disco Decade, though his style of play didn't earn him the accolades from the fans and media that so many others received. The ultimate team player, Pierre's coaches and teammates all appreciated his sacrificial contributions.


D Ted Graham

Defenceman Ted Graham played over 300 NHL games for six different franchises in the 20s and 30s. He was a reliable player in his own end and passed the puck to his forwards efficiently. (more info to follow)

C Brendan Morrison

...The young pivot scored 54 points and was solid at both ends of the ice while helping the Canucks reach the playoffs.

An important two-way player with the Canucks, Morrison's speed and anticipation landed him significant time on both specialty units. Since his arrival in Vancouver, Morrison has been one of the team's more durable and consistent players, establishing career highs in goals (25), assists (46) and points (71) during the 2002-03 season.

After a 60-point 2003-04 season in Vancouver, Morrison competed overseas with Linkopings HC in Sweden during the NHL lockout. He returned in 2005-06 and played his fifth consecutive 82 game season, extending his ironman streak to 512 consecutive games.


F Tim Hunter

Hunter was known as GM TheJudge's favorite player when he was 4.

Tim Hunter only scored 138 points in over 800 NHL games, but was a player every team in the NHL would have killed to have.

"I was a player with not a lot of talent but came to play every night and played very hard, hated to lose and loved the game and loved to win."

Tim had no measurable finesse skill to speak of. He was at best an average skater. He had no speed or agility on skates but had excellent balance, which aided him in the physical game. He could do little with the puck in terms of shooting, passing or handling. Most of his goals came by crashing the crease or accidentally deflecting off his shin guard.

While Tim lacked the skills to do the finesse game, he excelled at the physical game. He was as big and strong as they come. He did some good work along the boards and in front of the net. And of course Tim was a willing and good fighter, and occasionally would use his lumber in a not so legal manner.

Tim had a small and well defined role on the ice, but it is impossible to over exaggerate the importance of his contributions off of it. He was a great team player - excellent in the dressing rooms. The Calgary Flames became a powerhouse in the 1980s, and Tim's fingerprints are all over that. His wit, humor, support and leadership helped to mold a group of individuals into a top flight team. It is Tim's off ice contributions that were the most important contribution he made to his hockey team.
- Reen: Did you mean Bouchard when you talked about a player from the 70s who struggled to stay in the lineup year by year? It's really hard to judge how good Bouchard is because he played behind the big-3, but he got piss-poor icetime totals. Would he have been highly relied on by an average team? or was he truly #5/6 caliber? Your guess is as good as mine.

- I think Ted Graham is an excellent pick. It was only three voting points each time, but in 1931 and 1932 he tied for 7th in all-star voting for defensemen. that's at least some indication that he was a "star" player. Anyone from the past 40 years who was anything resembling a "star" was gone a long time ago.

- Brendan Morrison is decent. He was my #1 "A" pick following the AA draft.

- Tim Hunter... thank god you're not VI. I think he was the type of guy who would have been a favourite of mine growing up, too. But I'm not sure that a 9-10 minute forward is good enough to make the jump to this higher level. On the other hand, there are worse guys you could have taken, and he can't hurt you too much in limited minutes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrevolver View Post
Belleville Bulls will select two coaches:

First, a picture of excellence behind the bench for the Dallas Blackhawks winning several championships. Most notably, he also made the finals twice as the Jets coach including winning a title.

Coach - Bobby Kromm

My second pick was also a picture of excellence, but for the Ottawa 67's. Pretty sure everyone knows him if you are from Canada. The 4x OHA Coach of the Year and HHOF member has over 1000 wins and only had 6 losing seasons in the OHL (over a 35 year span) which is incredible in junior hockey.

Coach - Brian Kilrea
Nice tandem. Two of my top-5 guys remaining, and they bring a variety of experience between the two of them. They've won just about everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
Philadelphia also selects a player that is an elite PKer. He was an essential role player for the dynasty that was the Colorado Avalanche, and is a valuable team player that will center our 4th line, C Stephane Yelle



PK TOI Ranks(since stat was recorded): 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3
excellent penalty killer.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-01-2011 at 11:25 AM.
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Old
07-29-2011, 10:51 PM
  #222
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Montreal Bad Habits select Vladimir Malakhov D
and

Ian Laperriere RW

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Old
07-30-2011, 12:39 AM
  #223
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The Belleville Bulls select:

An excellent checking center..
C - Stu Barnes

..and..a very solid defender..
D - Frank Eddolls

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Old
07-30-2011, 01:26 AM
  #224
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I wasnt sure about the Ian Laperriere pick , and I still have my doubt but I just kept looking at a veyr large list of similar player ad decided to go with my heart on that one and think he can handle the 4th line , such a warrior.Any thoughts on that?

Any thoughts on Malakhov?

also the spelling on the main page is not correct , I read Mikhailov or something , or maybe it's the real pronounciation? In the NHL it was Malakhov though on his jerseys.

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07-30-2011, 01:35 AM
  #225
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReenMachine View Post
I wasnt sure about the Ian Laperriere pick , and I still have my doubt but I just kept looking at a veyr large list of similar player ad decided to go with my heart on that one and think he can handle the 4th line , such a warrior.Any thoughts on that?

Any thoughts on Malakhov? I know this player and his negatives very well , but in a way he's kind of strong right now compare to the majority of available D.
Laperriere was a great energy type guy in real life, but I can't help but think you could find a guy who could provide energy, but actually has more talent. I donno. Maybe it's hypocritical coming from someone who pushed hard for our team to draft Randy McKay. But I feel like McKay was a great leader and figher with excellent defensive credentials.

I don't feel like Laperriere was great at anything but "grinding." I know other GMs value "elite grinder" like Tim Hunter and Ian Laperriere, but I feel that if a player is actually an all-time great, he'll (at least for a little while) take on a role bigger than just a grinder.

As for Malakhov, interesting player. He was a failure whenever he was counted on as a real top 4 defenseman, and there are definitely guys left who were solid at that. But when Malahkov had a lesser role (NJ 2000), he absolutely excelled, and that's to his credit. Considering you are probably using him as a #5 considering where we are drafting, he's probably a solid pick.

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