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Rick Rypien passes away

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Old
08-15-2011, 11:46 PM
  #76
SaskaToba
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R.I.P. Rick Rypien, my favourite fighter since Tie Domi

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08-15-2011, 11:49 PM
  #77
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R.I.P. Rick. I wish it didn't have to end this way.

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08-16-2011, 12:05 AM
  #78
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hank Chinaski View Post
I can't erase the image of Rypien being interviewed on CBC during the intermission of the Moose-Abbotsford game, it was the fourth game since his return.

He had a genuine smile on his face, he seemed like he was truly enthused about playing hockey again, and he talked about how grateful he was that the Moose had given him a second chance. He just had the look of a guy who had put his demons behind him, and was focused on doing something he loved.
Agreed. So very sad. He also sounded excited during his last conference call. RIP Rick and condolences to his family and friends.


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Old
08-16-2011, 12:14 AM
  #79
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Originally Posted by Thrashers94 View Post
R.I.P Rick, I was really looking forward to the energy he would have brought to this team.

It's crazy how a NHL player or any pro-athlete can take their own life. You're living the dream of millions of people.
It really goes to show how devastating depression can be. If someone you love tells you they are depressed, take it very seriously.

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08-16-2011, 12:18 AM
  #80
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Originally Posted by Jet View Post
It really goes to show how devastating depression can be. If someone you love tells you they are depressed, take it very seriously.
This times a thousand. It's quite overlooked. Most see it as simple "sadness"... But man can it be crippling.

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Old
08-16-2011, 12:33 AM
  #81
Hank Chinaski
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Great article from Gary Lawless just posted on the Winnipeg Free Press site:

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/opi...127806578.html

Like many people here have speculated, it sounds like Rypien battled clinical depression.

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Old
08-16-2011, 12:41 AM
  #82
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Just saw this on msn.ca, wow. RIP.

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Old
08-16-2011, 12:45 AM
  #83
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it's too bad he never got a chance to even play a game for the Jets

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Old
08-16-2011, 12:49 AM
  #84
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I think that in many ways this puts the NHL and sports in general in perspective. This is a terrible reminder that the warriors on the ice and heroes to many are in fact regular people like us. Rick as had been documented in some cases and speculated in other dealt with adversity in his life that many people don't attribute to professional athletes. I sincerely hope that some good can come from this tragedy and people in similar circumstances will commit to the difficult task of seeking help for their issues.

As a Moose season ticket holder for years I had the oppurtunity a couple of times to meet some players Rick being one of them. From my experiences he was a great guy that never made it seem like a chore to meet fans. His style of play endeared him to all the fans who saw him play. His presence on the team made an impact of fans beyond his play on the ice. He will be missed by fans of the Moose, Canucks, Jets and hockey fans all over.

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Old
08-16-2011, 01:43 AM
  #85
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He knew his job, and he went out and did it very well.. You could always count on him.. He will be missed here in Vancouver.

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Old
08-16-2011, 01:46 AM
  #86
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Absolutely awful. Very sad day in the NHL. RIP Rick.

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Old
08-16-2011, 02:00 AM
  #87
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R.i.p

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08-16-2011, 02:00 AM
  #88
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I posted this in the Vancouver forum - I hope reposting it here isn't considered inappropriate.


Assuming the reports re: suicide are correct...
as someone who has struggled with mental illness for most of his adult life, it is impossible to accurately describe major depression to someone who has never experienced it. But I'll give it a half-assed shot anyway.

Depression is/was such a poor choice of name for the illness - the name leads people who don't know any better to think it's just being extra sad. It is not "the blues"; it is not "feeling down"; it is not simply expriencing sadness. It is a profound scrambling of your emotions and perceptions such that every negative feeling and thought our bodies have evolved to experience is amplified by a factor of 1000. It affects how you perceive the world, how you think and even what you think. Try to consider the emotional pain and upheaval that would come along with losing everyone you love in a terrible accident, then add the hurt of being cheated-on by the love of your life and the fear of being diagnosed with an aggressive cancer - all at once - and you have some sort of idea of the degree of emotional and mental pain that we are talking about.

For whatever reason, we have evolved the capacity to experience fear, sadness, and other negative emotions. Usually, those emotions are triggered as a result of a particular event: mother dies=grief; girlfriend dumps you=sadness; bear charges at you=fear. Major depression feels like someone / something has flipped every one of those emotional switches - often for no identifiable reason - and turned the sensitivity dials as high as they can go. The resulting pain is constant, all-encompassing, and seemingly never-ending. You can't eat, you can't sleep (or you do nothing BUT sleep), you can't laugh, you can't leave the house, you can't get off the couch. The basic mechanisms that spur motivation, joy, interest, love, etc (i.e. the things that make life worth living) are simply non-functional.

Getting through the worst of it is pure, teeth-gritting endurance. You are desperate to do something - absolutely. anything. - simply to take the overwhelming pain away. Drugs and alcohol are the most common coping mechanism, but they almost always make things far worse. Medication and/or counselling helps for many (me included), and sustained use keeps them from dropping below the lower threshold of "normal". Finding the right combination is trial and error, though, and some people never find it.

Suicide happens when profound pain simply overwhelms someone's ability to cope. That's all. It is not "running away"; it is not "giving up"; and it is certainly not "taking the easy way out". It's simply the option of last resort to make the pain stop. The feelings of others and the hurt that you will cause to your loved ones are simply non-factors when you are so far gone so as to attempt or commit suicide. Nothing matters but ending the pain.


RIP Rick. I hope the pain has stopped.

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Old
08-16-2011, 02:05 AM
  #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rec28 View Post
I posted this in the Vancouver forum - I hope reposting it here isn't considered inappropriate.


Assuming the reports re: suicide are correct...
as someone who has struggled with mental illness for most of his adult life, it is impossible to accurately describe major depression to someone who has never experienced it. But I'll give it a half-assed shot anyway.

Depression is/was such a poor choice of name for the illness - the name leads people who don't know any better to think it's just being extra sad. It is not "the blues"; it is not "feeling down"; it is not simply expriencing sadness. It is a profound scrambling of your emotions and perceptions such that every negative feeling and thought our bodies have evolved to experience is amplified by a factor of 1000. It affects how you perceive the world, how you think and even what you think. Try to consider the emotional pain and upheaval that would come along with losing everyone you love in a terrible accident, then add the hurt of being cheated-on by the love of your life and the fear of being diagnosed with an aggressive cancer - all at once - and you have some sort of idea of the degree of emotional and mental pain that we are talking about.

For whatever reason, we have evolved the capacity to experience fear, sadness, and other negative emotions. Usually, those emotions are triggered as a result of a particular event: mother dies=grief; girlfriend dumps you=sadness; bear charges at you=fear. Major depression feels like someone / something has flipped every one of those emotional switches - often for no identifiable reason - and turned the sensitivity dials as high as they can go. The resulting pain is constant, all-encompassing, and seemingly never-ending. You can't eat, you can't sleep (or you do nothing BUT sleep), you can't laugh, you can't leave the house, you can't get off the couch. The basic mechanisms that spur motivation, joy, interest, love, etc (i.e. the things that make life worth living) are simply non-functional.

Getting through the worst of it is pure, teeth-gritting endurance. You are desperate to do something - absolutely. anything. - simply to take the overwhelming pain away. Drugs and alcohol are the most common coping mechanism, but they almost always make things far worse. Medication and/or counselling helps for many (me included), and sustained use keeps them from dropping below the lower threshold of "normal". Finding the right combination is trial and error, though, and some people never find it.

Suicide happens when profound pain simply overwhelms someone's ability to cope. That's all. It is not "running away"; it is not "giving up"; and it is certainly not "taking the easy way out". It's simply the option of last resort to make the pain stop. The feelings of others and the hurt that you will cause to your loved ones are simply non-factors when you are so far gone so as to attempt or commit suicide. Nothing matters but ending the pain.


RIP Rick. I hope the pain has stopped.
Excellent post. Thank you.

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Old
08-16-2011, 02:15 AM
  #90
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Sad day ):

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Old
08-16-2011, 02:19 AM
  #91
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@Rec28- Thank you for posting. Your insight is important to understanding the issues Rick was facing.

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Old
08-16-2011, 02:54 AM
  #92
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For as boring as off-seasons are, this is never the sort of "shake up" anyone thinks of happening or thinks will suddenly pop up in the headlines the next day. RIP Rick and condolences to his family, friends and fans.

I don't mean to open up a potential can of worms, and mods feel free to delete this, but given the loss of two individuals this year, does anyone think the NHL may take a closer look at players that are "at-risk" (for lack of a better term) and exhibit malicious on/off-ice behavior whether it be towards themselves or others? Or perhaps something to rework how the substance abuse/behavior management program works? Then again I know nothing of how it works to begin with, but maybe something more to follow it up with and keep closer tabs on them.

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Old
08-16-2011, 03:13 AM
  #93
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Originally Posted by htk30 View Post
For as boring as off-seasons are, this is never the sort of "shake up" anyone thinks of happening or thinks will suddenly pop up in the headlines the next day. RIP Rick and condolences to his family, friends and fans.

I don't mean to open up a potential can of worms, and mods feel free to delete this, but given the loss of two individuals this year, does anyone think the NHL may take a closer look at players that are "at-risk" (for lack of a better term) and exhibit malicious on/off-ice behavior whether it be towards themselves or others? Or perhaps something to rework how the substance abuse/behavior management program works? Then again I know nothing of how it works to begin with, but maybe something more to follow it up with and keep closer tabs on them.
I don't think malicious behavior's the right word at all. Rypien certainly didn't intend to hurt anyone and Boogaard widely had a reputation as never wanting to hurt a fly. That said, I'll agree that the NHL absolutely needs to take the opportunity to raise awareness of both substance abuse and depression––particularly because hockey culture's answer to these sorts of issues tends to be to "tough it out," when that's about the worst thing possible for someone struggling with them.

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Old
08-16-2011, 03:36 AM
  #94
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As someone who suffers from very serious and sometimes debilitating depression, I know what it's like to not be able to find any way out of the darkness that is inside your head. It makes you impervious to everything else around you.

Rick Rypien, I wish you had seen the light. You were a warrior, who played the game of hockey with heart, you never backed down, you never stopped working. Your work ethic and toughness made you revered among teammates, and fans...My prayers are for your family and friends who lost someone close to their heart. And with all the enthusiasm that has grown in preparation for that very 1st game for the new Winnipeg Jets, you will be with us in spirit, in our heavy hearts. I wish you could have shared this experience with us. RIP, my friend.

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Old
08-16-2011, 03:43 AM
  #95
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I'm here to give my opinion because I think I can clear some thing sup and also this helps me with my issues as well. If Rypien did commit suicide I agree with the great post from rec28, suicide is not the easy way out it is the only way for someone in a depressed state to deal with the pain.

My somewhat connection to this is I also grew up playing high level hockey as an enforcer, I was paid to play and most nights ended up fighting once or twice. It was something I loved to do, the fighting part was okay but the sense of being there for the team was the high. I took a lot of punches and received some undiagnosed concussions and have come to realize the changes in my mindset. I have depressed days and feelings of anixiety for no apparent reason, I feel like I am outside my body and I suffer from anger issues over the smallest of situations. There are days where I sit in silence and think about leaving this world, but I make it through.

I am not saying these are reasons why Mr. RYPIEN was speculated as being depressed, it could be totally different. But in my opinion the pro sports world including the NHL needs to research the depression side of life after concussions.

My condolences to the Rypien family, maybe it was his time to go because Heaven needed someone to show Boogaard even small guys can fight!

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Old
08-16-2011, 04:34 AM
  #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rec28 View Post
I posted this in the Vancouver forum - I hope reposting it here isn't considered inappropriate.


Assuming the reports re: suicide are correct...
as someone who has struggled with mental illness for most of his adult life, it is impossible to accurately describe major depression to someone who has never experienced it. But I'll give it a half-assed shot anyway.

Depression is/was such a poor choice of name for the illness - the name leads people who don't know any better to think it's just being extra sad. It is not "the blues"; it is not "feeling down"; it is not simply expriencing sadness. It is a profound scrambling of your emotions and perceptions such that every negative feeling and thought our bodies have evolved to experience is amplified by a factor of 1000. It affects how you perceive the world, how you think and even what you think. Try to consider the emotional pain and upheaval that would come along with losing everyone you love in a terrible accident, then add the hurt of being cheated-on by the love of your life and the fear of being diagnosed with an aggressive cancer - all at once - and you have some sort of idea of the degree of emotional and mental pain that we are talking about.

For whatever reason, we have evolved the capacity to experience fear, sadness, and other negative emotions. Usually, those emotions are triggered as a result of a particular event: mother dies=grief; girlfriend dumps you=sadness; bear charges at you=fear. Major depression feels like someone / something has flipped every one of those emotional switches - often for no identifiable reason - and turned the sensitivity dials as high as they can go. The resulting pain is constant, all-encompassing, and seemingly never-ending. You can't eat, you can't sleep (or you do nothing BUT sleep), you can't laugh, you can't leave the house, you can't get off the couch. The basic mechanisms that spur motivation, joy, interest, love, etc (i.e. the things that make life worth living) are simply non-functional.

Getting through the worst of it is pure, teeth-gritting endurance. You are desperate to do something - absolutely. anything. - simply to take the overwhelming pain away. Drugs and alcohol are the most common coping mechanism, but they almost always make things far worse. Medication and/or counselling helps for many (me included), and sustained use keeps them from dropping below the lower threshold of "normal". Finding the right combination is trial and error, though, and some people never find it.

Suicide happens when profound pain simply overwhelms someone's ability to cope. That's all. It is not "running away"; it is not "giving up"; and it is certainly not "taking the easy way out". It's simply the option of last resort to make the pain stop. The feelings of others and the hurt that you will cause to your loved ones are simply non-factors when you are so far gone so as to attempt or commit suicide. Nothing matters but ending the pain.


RIP Rick. I hope the pain has stopped.
Very accurate and informative post. I don't want to speculate that this has anything to do with fighting or head injuries because I can't relate to a professional athlete and the pressures that come with the career but in going with the depression post, I had 4 concussions that have been diagnosed over the course of my very unexciting hockey career and either way, it led to a bout of depression and anxiety that was worse than anything I could wish upon my worst enemy. One day you could very well be able to put on a happy face and make it through a lot of social interaction and one would think that it would be a sign of progress but it really isnt. You have no idea when its going to spark back up again and trying to "solve" depression or anxiety on your own is impossible. I had to quit playing competively for good and its been over a year and although I've made progress, I can sympathize with where these guys are coming from. Depression is a disease and as much as you and other people around you may want to tell you to snap out of it, it's just not going to happen until you start talking to a trained professional, change your lifestyle drastically, or find the right medication. I just hate the fact that this is becoming a trend in hockey.

RIP Rick, the best pound for pound fighter in the NHL for awhile.

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Old
08-16-2011, 07:01 AM
  #97
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shocking

hopefully it is not because of anything bad

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08-16-2011, 07:13 AM
  #98
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Heard about this on my twitter feed this morning. I'm lost for words really, it's just so upsetting that someone so young can die and it really does make you think how lucky you are. RIP to Rypien.

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Old
08-16-2011, 07:49 AM
  #99
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Just awful.

I was going to get 11 and my own name on my jersey this year, the 11 both for Rypien and the year the Jets came back. Now I'm still going for the 11 for sure.

He was at my son's banquet a few years back and presented him with his MVP trophy, and something like that, well you know its enough to make a guy one of your instant favorites.

rest in peace.

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08-16-2011, 07:58 AM
  #100
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590radio is saying he took his own life--as someone who has struggled with depression hit too close to home

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