HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Help on getting puck off boards in defensive zone: Winger

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
09-02-2011, 10:26 AM
  #1
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
Help on getting puck off boards in defensive zone: Winger

I'm talking about when my defense has the puck in our defensive zone. As a right or left winger I get on the boards at the top of the circle or hash marks correct? I'm a right handed shot. My question is what is the proper way to receive that pass or hard clear around the boards?

I was on the right side last night. Tried my backhand with limited success. Next I tried putting my back to the boards and letting it hit my left skate (heel on the boards) which resulted in the puck going into the slot and a goal.

Any advice appreciated. What's the proper way?

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 11:28 AM
  #2
beth
Registered User
 
beth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Bellevue, WA
Country: United States
Posts: 539
vCash: 500
The way I was taught is that you let it hit the inside of the foot (the one furthest from the goal) and then angle it so it deflects right onto your stick. So that foot is against the boards, the other foot is away from the boards to let the puck through.

Now, I've never actually pulled this off in a game, I'm usually just chasing the puck as it blows by me.

beth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 12:42 PM
  #3
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
It sounds like you're on the right track. What you will want to do is anchor your butt against the boards with the leg closest to the blueline angled towards the blueline (45 degrees away from the boards as opposed to flush against the boards). At best the puck will bounce right up to your stick, and at worst it will get caught up in your feet, but you should be able to easily recover it. This is a good default position to be in. However, it certainly doesn't mean that you *have* to sit along the boards like this regardless of what's happening.

A big part of a successful breakout is being able to read the play. What you do and where you go will largely depend on your defenseman's situation with the puck and the location of your other winger and the center. I usually only anchor myself in that default position when I see both the other winger and the center streaking up the ice. It gives the D-man a shorter, safer pass option. You can then move the puck to your center from there.

If you feel like there's a lane for a pass you can start streaking up the ice early, or if there's a lot of pressure down low and the pass looks like it's soft, you can skate back into the zone towards it. The key to being able to do this well, IMO, is the crossover start. That way you can face the action and see everything while still being able to get moving quickly in either direction when necessary.

Receiving a pass while in motion gives you many more options. If you're anchored along the boards, for example, and a picture perfect pass comes your way, it's often better to take a quick stride or two before receiving the pass than it is to stand still, receive the pass, and then start moving.



The *worst* thing you can do as a winger trying to receive the puck is to turn facing the boards and try to get the puck with just your stick. First of all, it's dangerous. You never know when a newbie player will come steam-rolling into you from behind. Secondly, it's not very effective. If it's a hard pass you might lose control of it, and if it's not flat along the ice you might miss it entirely. Thirdly, when you do receive the puck you can't see where anyone else is, and by the time you turn around to see the play in a stationary position you will be under pressure from the opposition.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 01:28 PM
  #4
Steelhead16
Registered User
 
Steelhead16's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Boise, ID
Country: United States
Posts: 1,545
vCash: 500
What I teach my kids to do is first I don't really want my defensemen to rail the puck up the boards so I have my forwards with their butts against the boards waiting for a pass to their stick. Unfortunately there are times when the puck just needs to be fired up the borads. So in that case (doesn't matter which side you are on) just turn toward the point (keeping your face toward the middle of the ice, not facing the boards, you will lose sight of the puck for a second but you know where it is) and get your stick blade strong on the boards to receive the puck. 3 things can happen and none of them is horrible. A lot of hockey is limiting the opportunities for huge mistakes that result in goals. If you turn and receive the puck facing the point you are facing in the attacking direction and then can either pass to another breaking player or chip the puck out. Or 2, if you receive it and then get hit or tied up you keep yourself from facing the boards and also keep yourself between the puck and the slot. And 3, if you miss it the puck goes to the point and not in front of the net and you are facing that way already and you can go out and force the pointman or block his shot or pass.

Don't over think things or get fancy. Work situations from best case scenerio to worst case and then prioritize. Do all this in practice or at home and think of typical situations you get into and make a plan so you don't have to figure it out on the fly. Best way to slow down the game is to KNOW what you want to do.

Steelhead16 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 09:24 PM
  #5
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,606
vCash: 500
Slam that leg up tight against the boards to stop it...or if you're really cool time it just right and swat at the puck so it hops the stick of the point man for the other team and you skate past for a breakaway. I'm not cool so I typically get there late and watch the point man get a goal.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 09:55 PM
  #6
jntadt22
Registered User
 
jntadt22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Who cares
Country: United States
Posts: 239
vCash: 500
I agree with Steelhead, you can't have your D-man just railing the puck up the boards. A nice crisp pass tape to tape is the ideal situation. You need to help your d-man out though and a give him a target first, with your body positioned up ice.
pop
You have to rely on your teammates especially in this situation. You should then have no less than three options at all times to finish the break out. None of these options are bad, and totally depend on the opposing team.

Once you catch the puck...... you can skate it out of the zone, or your center should be looping up to give him a quick pass, or you can pop the puck out of the zone.

If your d-man are just rifling the puck along the boards, ask them to give you a straight pass. The only way it should be rifled, if that is the only option for him. He should the same three minimum options to initiate the break-out. He should have you on the wing, or the center curling up ice, or turn back behind the night to the weak (other) side of the ice.

That's my opinion, for what it's worth!!! It never seems to work the way it's supposed to though!!!!!

jntadt22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 10:02 PM
  #7
duul
Registered User
 
duul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,874
vCash: 50
Man I play the wing and play junior and still have trouble with it. As the poster above me said you shouldn't even really have to be receiving passes like that on a good team, as your D will usually be hitting you with a pass to your tape. If they do need to ring it just keep trying different stuff to see what fits for you. I'm also a RW and right-handed so I usually have my left foot a bit ahead of my right and angle my right foot so it's coming off the boards on an angle. This lets the puck bounce off usually around your blade if you just angle it properly.

A safe play if you're skating back to your own zone and they rifle it around fast enough, just angle your blade and tip it high off the glass on your forehand and out. Seems like a weird way to do it but gets the job done.

duul is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-02-2011, 10:15 PM
  #8
jntadt22
Registered User
 
jntadt22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Who cares
Country: United States
Posts: 239
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by duul View Post
Man I play the wing and play junior and still have trouble with it. As the poster above me said you shouldn't even really have to be receiving passes like that on a good team, as your D will usually be hitting you with a pass to your tape. If they do need to ring it just keep trying different stuff to see what fits for you. I'm also a RW and right-handed so I usually have my left foot a bit ahead of my right and angle my right foot so it's coming off the boards on an angle. This lets the puck bounce off usually around your blade if you just angle it properly.

A safe play if you're skating back to your own zone and they rifle it around fast enough, just angle your blade and tip it high off the glass on your forehand and out. Seems like a weird way to do it but gets the job done.
That's actually a good tip, to just tip the puck up off the glass! I'm the defenseman giving you the ****** pass!!!!!!

jntadt22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-03-2011, 10:29 PM
  #9
SERE 24
LGR
 
SERE 24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 9,779
vCash: 500
Just sounds like you need practice. It's definitely true that a tape to tape pass is preferable, but the reality is there's just no way for your defender to ALWAYS have that play and they're going to send the puck around the boards at times, so you need to be able to play it cleanly. When you play the puck off your skate from the boards, it should definitely not be going into the slot for a goal... and even though it's not ideal to be picking the puck up on your backhand, with enough practice you'll be able to scoop the puck in motion, standing still, on the forehand, on the backhand, off either skate, while looking up the ice... it just comes with repetition and polishing your overall puck control, etc.

SERE 24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 06:41 AM
  #10
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
Thanks for all the tips guys. I'm gonna try the butt on the boards and right skate angled 45degrees for the really hard clears around the boards. I tried picking it up on my back hand, but kept missing them. I think part of that is being a little tentative to look behind me/toward the boards in a league full of cheap shot artists.

Tape to tape is definitely ideal, but in those situations where my D is under pressure behind the net they will fire it up the boards.

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 08:33 AM
  #11
Dr Van Nostrand
Banned
 
Dr Van Nostrand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Country: United States
Posts: 901
vCash: 500
tell your D-men to stop passing the puck along the boards

Dr Van Nostrand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 09:49 AM
  #12
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwmcd24 View Post
tell your D-men to stop passing the puck along the boards
Watch an NHL game and tell me the puck never comes up the boards. It does. Under pressure, puck gets deflected, or maybe it's the opposing team throwing it around the boards.

I will tell them, but the fact is there are still times when it happens and I need to know how to handle it. I can already receive a hard tape to tape pass pretty well. My problem is digging it off the boards effectively.

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 11:47 AM
  #13
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Tape to tape is definitely ideal, but in those situations where my D is under pressure behind the net they will fire it up the boards.
See if you can get them to fire it hard off the glass while you start streaking up the ice as opposed to hard and low along the boards.

A shot off the glass will be harder for the opposing D-men to intercept, and the contact of the glass at the proper angle will ensure that the puck loses enough momentum for you to be able to control it somewhere in the neutral zone.


Even if the opposing D-man blocks the puck with his body or catches it, he'll have to let the puck drop to the ice to control it with his stick, giving you time to try and knock the puck off of him. Since it's not the NHL, you'll get a faceoff in your own end if you shoot the puck over the glass.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 02:32 PM
  #14
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
See if you can get them to fire it hard off the glass while you start streaking up the ice as opposed to hard and low along the boards.

A shot off the glass will be harder for the opposing D-men to intercept, and the contact of the glass at the proper angle will ensure that the puck loses enough momentum for you to be able to control it somewhere in the neutral zone.


Even if the opposing D-man blocks the puck with his body or catches it, he'll have to let the puck drop to the ice to control it with his stick, giving you time to try and knock the puck off of him. Since it's not the NHL, you'll get a faceoff in your own end if you shoot the puck over the glass.
Good point. Around the boards does put me in a less than ideal position. I can't generate speed and/or have to look behind me making it easy for their D to pinch.

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 03:37 PM
  #15
arne0107
Rookie User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 11
vCash: 500
As a goalie you shouldn't take my advice TOO seriously... this is just my criticism from what I see half the time...

I don't think your technique is what's flawed from what you describe... there's no actual single right or wrong way to do it. I would say avoid depending on your skate. Learn to use your stick as your primary option at all times and use your skates as your secondary mode of receiving a pass.

The absolute worst thing you can do other than literally joining the fray is to anchor down and wait for the pass. Smart and perceptive players will anticipate the angles of the play and will either swarm you the second you receive the biscuit or will intercept the pass all together, leaving you flat footed. I always tell my forwards to keep their feet moving and anticipate the breakout. My advice to you is keep your feet moving, rove your anticipated zone and meet the pass with your stick.

Most importantly, just keep practicing.

arne0107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-04-2011, 07:36 PM
  #16
PanniniClaus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,481
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post

The *worst* thing you can do as a winger trying to receive the puck is to turn facing the boards and try to get the puck with just your stick. First of all, it's dangerous. You never know when a newbie player will come steam-rolling into you from behind. Secondly, it's not very effective. If it's a hard pass you might lose control of it, and if it's not flat along the ice you might miss it entirely. Thirdly, when you do receive the puck you can't see where anyone else is, and by the time you turn around to see the play in a stationary position you will be under pressure from the opposition.
The thing you label as the worst thing to do is the correct way to receive a ring. The idea is to be a stick length from the wall, you need to do a shoulder check to see what level of pressure you are under. Because the puck will hug the wall you have a chance to check for pressure. Once you receive it on your stick you can make your play without making a second move or a second touch. If you are under too much pressure to receive the ring on the stick you can take the bump, play the puck with your feet and wait for help.

If the puck hops over your stick the puck is only at the point where you still have a chance to get in the shooting lane.

If you make a play with your ass to the wall and try to make a skate to stick touch you lose valuable time, cannot make a quick move and the puck can end up in the slot for a prime scoring chance.

The only condition i would not advocate taking a ring with the stick is if the skill level is low. The risk of injury does go up and there is little to be gained.

Watch the pros - most of them are not spending time trying to kick the puck to their stick. They are either receiving the ring and making a play, protecting the puck under heavy pressure or chiping past a pinching d.

PanniniClaus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 07:48 AM
  #17
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
It seems there is no consensus so I guess I'll have to figure it out for myself.

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 10:58 AM
  #18
arne0107
Rookie User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 11
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
It seems there is no consensus so I guess I'll have to figure it out for myself.
Well there's no one right answer. Look at it this way, if you got the rush going the opposite direction, you made the right choice.

I think strategy should be the least of your worries right now and you should focus on stick skills and skating. It's amazing how much easier the game gets when you really nail down fundamentals.

arne0107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 12:01 PM
  #19
Dr Van Nostrand
Banned
 
Dr Van Nostrand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Country: United States
Posts: 901
vCash: 500
Just practice, practice, practice. There really is no one answer, as the poster above me said. Just go to a stick and puck time and have one of your friends pass you the puck quickly along the boards and try out a bunch of different ways.

Dr Van Nostrand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 02:56 PM
  #20
Guffaw
Registered User
 
Guffaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Drexel Hill PA
Country: United States
Posts: 485
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by wwmcd24 View Post
Just practice, practice, practice. There really is no one answer, as the poster above me said. Just go to a stick and puck time and have one of your friends pass you the puck quickly along the boards and try out a bunch of different ways.
Will do. Skating, shooting, passing, and to a lesser extent stick handling are coming along. Probably because I can work on those in warm ups and open hockeys. It's the in game scenarios and positioning that I really need help on.

I'll try a few different ways. Like was said it will really depend on the situation. How hard is the clear, pressure from the D, etc.

Left skate at a 90 degree angle on the right boards is out though Right onto their centers stick in the slot and in our net. Still pissed about it.

Guffaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 04:32 PM
  #21
PanniniClaus
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,481
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Will do. Skating, shooting, passing, and to a lesser extent stick handling are coming along. Probably because I can work on those in warm ups and open hockeys. It's the in game scenarios and positioning that I really need help on.

I'll try a few different ways. Like was said it will really depend on the situation. How hard is the clear, pressure from the D, etc.

Left skate at a 90 degree angle on the right boards is out though Right onto their centers stick in the slot and in our net. Still pissed about it.
What you describe is the worst case scenario - learn from it and move on. As I coach I get upset during a game or practice if my players do this.

PanniniClaus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 05:09 PM
  #22
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by PanniniClaus View Post
The thing you label as the worst thing to do is the correct way to receive a ring. The idea is to be a stick length from the wall, you need to do a shoulder check to see what level of pressure you are under. Because the puck will hug the wall you have a chance to check for pressure. Once you receive it on your stick you can make your play without making a second move or a second touch. If you are under too much pressure to receive the ring on the stick you can take the bump, play the puck with your feet and wait for help.
Are we talking about the same thing here?

It's fine to be standing a little bit away from the boards (that's what I do), but if you're facing the side boards what are you going to do with the puck? You can't see what's happening because your face is in glass, and by the time you look to see what's happening you're covered. When I learned to play we were told that it's better to skate for the puck than it is to stand and wait for it to get to you, and that you shouldn't keep your back to the play on a breakout unless you're quickly turning.

As a left shot on LW, I'll try to control a hard ream up the boards on my backhand while skating forward, or turn into the boards to receive the puck and quickly skate down low before curling and making a pass or clearing.

It's hard to explain in words.

Quote:
If you make a play with your ass to the wall and try to make a skate to stick touch you lose valuable time, cannot make a quick move and the puck can end up in the slot for a prime scoring chance.
If you read my entire post, you'll notice that I suggest grabbing the puck with your feet moving. Hard to do anchored against the boards with your butt against the wall, but for a beginner it is a good strategy, and it's what many coaches and hockey schools teach.

Quote:
The only condition i would not advocate taking a ring with the stick is if the skill level is low. The risk of injury does go up and there is little to be gained.
I would figure that someone trying to figure out how to position themselves on a breakout is playing at a low level.

Quote:
Watch the pros - most of them are not spending time trying to kick the puck to their stick. They are either receiving the ring and making a play, protecting the puck under heavy pressure or chiping past a pinching d.
I do watch the pros. They generally try to stand parallel to the boards so as to be able to keep an eye on the entire zone. They can see what's ahead of them and what's behind them.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-05-2011, 05:10 PM
  #23
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,541
vCash: 500
Atleast you're in the right position. 1/2 the time with my one team I'll curl around behind our net under pressure looking for the right winger on the boards and there's no skaters on the whole right side of the zone. The wingers all moved to the left side where the puck was or collapsed around our net. Thus, giving zero pass options to get the puck out, let alone create an offensive rush.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2011, 01:44 AM
  #24
arne0107
Rookie User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 11
vCash: 500
You could eliminate this problem all together by going goalie!

arne0107 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-06-2011, 12:57 PM
  #25
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,606
vCash: 500
Standard breakout is to have the strong side winger at the hashmarks with your butt on the boards and give the D a passing target with the forehand of your stick. D passes to the wing who is stationary so the center cuts through for the breakout pass, and the center and weak side winger lead the rush up the ice with the strong side winger trailing.

Throwing the puck up the boards is a panic play so either stopping it with your leg/skate or chipping it past the D is your option there.

Even better for the breakout is if you can catch a pass while moving up ice so you can jump the zone even faster, and that requires more skill/practice, especially catching the puck on the backhand if you're playing the off wing.

At lower levels it's ridiculously easy to chip the puck off the boards and around the D for a breakaway or rush. At higher levels the other team's forwards will be pressuring you while the D backs off to prevent a rush.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:33 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.