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The History of Hockey Relive great moments in hockey history and discuss how the game has changed over time.

It was 39 Years Ago Today

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Old
09-30-2011, 01:43 AM
  #76
Zine
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Originally Posted by Canadiens1958 View Post
That is the point. No country holds a monopoly on the negative elements of hockey, poor coaching, players losing it in the heat of competition or whatever other demons come down the road.

Its true that no country is immune from such actions; however, its a fact that certain hockey cultures tolerate these actions more than others.
For instance, bench clearing brawls and goon tactic were a common occurance in the NHL during the cold war....particularly 1970s. Was this element prevalent in Soviet hockey? Sure. However nowhere close the levels of NHL.



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Eliminating irrationality from the sport is what matters.
Yes it is. And the easiest way to achieve that is by eradicating it from a country's hockey culture.
FYI, I think NA hockey has done a remarkable job in recent years phasing goonery out of the game.

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09-30-2011, 01:50 AM
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Well, okay, even Kharlamov 'played' in the game 8 of the Summit series.

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09-30-2011, 01:57 AM
  #78
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A few years back, I remember reading a Tsygankov interview (on the internet) where he mentioned the incident, and I think he sort of half-admitted that he did it on purpose (and was definitely sorry). But I haven't been able to find the interview later on, even though I've looked for it. I wonder if it's still available; do you have a link?

By the way, Martinec was able to play in CSSR's final game against Finland (which Finland won 5-4 ) a couple days later, so what ever Tsygankov did to him, he didn't do as much damage as Clarke (gooning in Soviet style = more sophisticated? ).
Likely the same interview, because it was a while ago I read it. If I recall correctly (and thats a big if, I'm not positive at all) i had to run it through a translator - it wasn't in English or Russian.

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09-30-2011, 02:39 AM
  #79
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Likely the same interview, because it was a while ago I read it. If I recall correctly (and thats a big if, I'm not positive at all) i had to run it through a translator - it wasn't in English or Russian.
Okay. Even if it's the same, the one I read had already been translated into English. I think the interview took place during some World Championships (2002, 2003, 2004?)... well, certainly before 2006 (when Tsygankov passed away).


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09-30-2011, 12:33 PM
  #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zine View Post
Its true that no country is immune from such actions; however, its a fact that certain hockey cultures tolerate these actions more than others. For instance, bench clearing brawls and goon tactic were a common occurrence in the NHL during the cold war....particularly 1970s. Was this element prevalent in Soviet hockey? Sure. However nowhere close the levels of NHL.
Yes, I completely agree. Remember, Bandy was the most popular ice sport in Russia pre-WW2. A link that also greatly influenced the North American game some 75yrs earlier. The Soviets approached Anatoli Tarasov upon conclusion of the hostilities, asking him to set-up a Hockey Department through the Red Army Sports Club. Hatched in an incubator, Tarasovs' rather elite & utopian philosophies included all manner of intensive & then novel training techniques that would likely even today lay waste to any number of so called "well conditioned" hockey players.

Based on "Comradeship & Caring for Each Other", in order to make the squad you had to be "approved" by each member of the team. The game played one of skating, finesse, passing, minimal body contact & when deployed, absolutely respectful & clean. For every 150 passes their opponents made in a game, the Soviets would aim to make 270+, thus retaining puck possession & giving them 120 more opportunities to either score or prevent a goal.

Put into the context of the times, their was a great deal of frustration (and actual anger) in Canadian hockey circles from the late 50's through the 60's that here you had Russian "Pro's" (full time 12mnths of the year paid players/soldiers) dominating International competition, claiming "World Supremacy", the IIHF barring Canadian & American professionals from competing. Obviously, the pent up frustration, anger & hostilities reached a boil during the Summit Series and resulted in all kinds of ugly incidents, Eaglesons & Clarkes the most visible. As we know too, the game had changed in North America from 67-8 onward, radically IMO, a loss of respect for ones fellow players dropping precipitously during that 5 year period post expansion; the WHA start-up etc. With so many new employment opportunities opening up, guys who previously wouldve been playing in the ECHL finding good paying jobs in the IHL, AHL, WHA & NHL. If you couldnt stop someone cleanly because you lacked the talent, there was always Plan 'B'; a 2 hander, a trip, clutch n' grab, "lets go"...


Last edited by Killion: 09-30-2011 at 12:44 PM.
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Old
09-30-2011, 04:14 PM
  #81
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Originally Posted by Killion View Post
Yes, I completely agree. Remember, Bandy was the most popular ice sport in Russia pre-WW2. A link that also greatly influenced the North American game some 75yrs earlier. The Soviets approached Anatoli Tarasov upon conclusion of the hostilities, asking him to set-up a Hockey Department through the Red Army Sports Club. Hatched in an incubator, Tarasovs' rather elite & utopian philosophies included all manner of intensive & then novel training techniques that would likely even today lay waste to any number of so called "well conditioned" hockey players.

Based on "Comradeship & Caring for Each Other", in order to make the squad you had to be "approved" by each member of the team. The game played one of skating, finesse, passing, minimal body contact & when deployed, absolutely respectful & clean. For every 150 passes their opponents made in a game, the Soviets would aim to make 270+, thus retaining puck possession & giving them 120 more opportunities to either score or prevent a goal.

Put into the context of the times, their was a great deal of frustration (and actual anger) in Canadian hockey circles from the late 50's through the 60's that here you had Russian "Pro's" (full time 12mnths of the year paid players/soldiers) dominating International competition, claiming "World Supremacy", the IIHF barring Canadian & American professionals from competing. Obviously, the pent up frustration, anger & hostilities reached a boil during the Summit Series and resulted in all kinds of ugly incidents, Eaglesons & Clarkes the most visible. As we know too, the game had changed in North America from 67-8 onward, radically IMO, a loss of respect for ones fellow players dropping precipitously during that 5 year period post expansion; the WHA start-up etc. With so many new employment opportunities opening up, guys who previously wouldve been playing in the ECHL finding good paying jobs in the IHL, AHL, WHA & NHL. If you couldnt stop someone cleanly because you lacked the talent, there was always Plan 'B'; a 2 hander, a trip, clutch n' grab, "lets go"...
Yes i agree.

Ironically, we're starting to see chippy play seep into the Russian game at the youth level.
Kids are playing with more emotion and physicality, but those elements aren't always channeled in a positive direction......I think mainly due to questionalbe coaching at the youth level.

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09-30-2011, 05:46 PM
  #82
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True

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Yes i agree.

Ironically, we're starting to see chippy play seep into the Russian game at the youth level.
Kids are playing with more emotion and physicality, but those elements aren't always channeled in a positive direction......I think mainly due to questionalbe coaching at the youth level.
True played and then coached/administrator from the 1950s onwards in working class districts of Montreal. Whenever there were the serious discipline problems they were traced back to inadequate coaching.

How are coaches hired at the youth level in Russia and how are they assigned the age group they coach?

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09-30-2011, 11:25 PM
  #83
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How are coaches hired at the youth level in Russia and how are they assigned the age group they coach?
Back in the day at the point of a Walther PPK.


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