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The AAA 2011 Draft

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Old
10-16-2011, 04:27 PM
  #326
BillyShoe1721
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Lol you dirty *******. I was replying to say something along those lines.

But yeah, I assume you meant "top pk forward, right? No stats available at the mo', but I assume they were the pptoi leaders... right?
Yes, that's in terms of forwards from 97-98 to 99-00 I believe.

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10-16-2011, 04:55 PM
  #327
VanIslander
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On second thought, Pellerin is not a good pick. Three bloody seasons? Because of a stat that he had a small part of? Indeed Pronger and MacInnis were THE reason the PK was so dominant. I barely remember Pellerin's contribution and I have watched Prongs his whole career.

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Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
I was hoping he'd slip to the next draft
That's the spirit! So far three of us have indicated intention to participate in a Double-A Draft this year. I'm sure we'll get the minimum four teams to make a go of it!


Last edited by VanIslander: 10-16-2011 at 05:07 PM.
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10-16-2011, 05:16 PM
  #328
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While we're talking about the AA draft I would also like to confirm my entrance into that draft this year. Lots of good talent left out there, even after we're done this one.

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10-16-2011, 06:06 PM
  #329
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
On second thought, Pellerin is not a good pick. Three bloody seasons? Because of a stat that he had a small part of? Indeed Pronger and MacInnis were THE reason the PK was so dominant. I barely remember Pellerin's contribution and I have watched Prongs his whole career.
Does it help that he was rewarded with a 10th place finish in selke voting in 1999?

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10-16-2011, 06:13 PM
  #330
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Montreal select Jocelyn Thibault G


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10-16-2011, 06:31 PM
  #331
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Does it help that he was rewarded with a 10th place finish in selke voting in 1999?
Nope. He had one two-way season in a short career, sent down four times to the AHL early and late in his career, basically only three years in St. Louis and two more kicked around elsewhere. A short career, no playoff success, not a lot of intangibles, he's a pretty bare bones defensive forward pick when several better options are out there, guys with longer careers, significant playoffs, praises and intangibles. The guys was a marginal NHLer during a time when the NHL was its biggest (unlike O6 era when AHL duty actually isn't such a big negative) and he's picked because he had ONE season where a few voters recognized his defensive play, over a mere three years of heavy duty on a St. Louis penalty kill that clearly ran on the all-time great performances of the blueliners in conjunction with goaltending. This is a very bad stat pick imo. The more you look at it, the uglier it looks.

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10-16-2011, 07:00 PM
  #332
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Dale Rolfe, D



A fearsome defensive defenseman who was one of the biggest players of his era, at 6'4" and 210 pounds.

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10-16-2011, 07:21 PM
  #333
TheDevilMadeMe
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With one of our picks, the Indians select the man who I think is only player in the entire AAA draft with 2 Top 10 finishes in Selke voting.

Travis Zajac, C
  • 6'3' 200 lbs
  • 7th in Selke voting in 2008-09
  • 6th in Selke voting in 2009-10
  • 25th in Selke voting in 2010-11 (2 votes)
  • 249 points in 408 career games
  • 12 points in 28 career playoff games

He'll center our fourth line and top PK unit. He's not a bruiser, but he has a big body that he uses to protect the puck. Excellent defensively with some offensive upside.

We'll choose our other guy later.

Edit: Was hoping to get one of the Mironovs later to round our our defense corps. Good pick with Sid Abel too. I wanted him in the MLD, but vecens was scared off by his losing record.


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10-16-2011, 10:57 PM
  #334
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Nope. He had one two-way season in a short career, sent down four times to the AHL early and late in his career, basically only three years in St. Louis and two more kicked around elsewhere. A short career, no playoff success, not a lot of intangibles, he's a pretty bare bones defensive forward pick when several better options are out there, guys with longer careers, significant playoffs, praises and intangibles. The guys was a marginal NHLer during a time when the NHL was its biggest (unlike O6 era when AHL duty actually isn't such a big negative) and he's picked because he had ONE season where a few voters recognized his defensive play, over a mere three years of heavy duty on a St. Louis penalty kill that clearly ran on the all-time great performances of the blueliners in conjunction with goaltending. This is a very bad stat pick imo. The more you look at it, the uglier it looks.
I didn't even know he had a 10th in Selke voting. I checked, and it's actually a 9th, he and Rolston tied with 28. How exactly does finishing in 10th not help his resume? What about leading the league in shorthanded goals one year? It matters nothing that he was the #1 penalty killer for a team that made the playoffs 3 years in a row, once winning the President's Trophy in runaway fashion? In the playoffs those 3 years he was 2nd in SH TOI, with #1 and #2 being far ahead of everyone else. Looking at him offensively(HR's adjusted stats are messed up so I guessed 99-00 would be 51 points and 00-01 would be 18. Either way, it's in the right ballpark. That gives him a career adjusted PPG of .4608. Now, let's look at your pick of Val Fonteyne. No significant playoff success for him either. His adjusted PPG is .290, and that's before I adjust it for games played, which I'm not going to bother to do. (This is assuming his 64-65 season is adjusted to 8 points, and considering the adjusted points for 65-66 is the same as the amount of points he had, I think it's legitimate). If I did that, the gap would widen, and that's all we need to know. Okay, Fonteyne has longevity. Does it make up for Pellerin having a .1708 advanted in PPG? I don't think so. In the stats we have, Fonteyne killed 35.1% of his team's penalties. Pellerin killed 38.2% ins his relevant years. Fonteyne is the better penalty killer, but Pellerin is the better shorthanded threat. The Selke didn't exist when Fonteyne was a player. Pellerin could also play all 3 forward positions, and to my knowledge Val could not. Considering all that, is it such a bad pick? I'm not trying to sell him as being a steal this late, and it was more of a lazy pick than anything, but I don't think it's bad.

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10-16-2011, 11:19 PM
  #335
VanIslander
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
I.... let's look at your pick of Val Fonteyne. No significant playoff success for him either.
Fonteyne was a penalty killer on THREE Stanley Cup Finals runs. He is by no means a goal scorer and if you are thinking of judging or comparing Fonteyne or Pellerin by their offense you're barking up the wrong tree: a defensive forward ought not to be judged by offensive stats. Fonteyne was tied for 4th in Detroit playoff scoring (with Labine and Pronovost) in their 1961 Cup run with 5 points in 11 games, but his scoring is beside the point, his defense isn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
Okay, Fonteyne has longevity.
Fonteyne played five consecutive complete seasons of Original Six hockey between 1959-60 and 1963-64. Yeah, he didn't score even 10 goals a season until his five consecutive seasons with expansion Pittsburgh between 1967-68 and 1971-72; two complete five year stretches, one in the Original Six era, one in the Expansion Era. He wasn't on an offensive line nor expected to do that. he checked and killed penalties and did that well. That's his role as a solid role player.

And then there's the marginal NHLer: Pellerin's three years in St. Louis followed by two elsewhere among AHL call-ups and send downs in a 30-team NHL is supposed to be comparable because Pellerin has a slightly higher points per game statistical average (one 20 goal season)?

Fonteyne and Pellerin don't belong in the same zip code. Fonteyne is arguably a MLD 4th liner this year whereas Pellerin is no better than Double-A Bottom-6 forwards, as we shall see.

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10-16-2011, 11:20 PM
  #336
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Velociraptor View Post
Dale Rolfe, D



A fearsome defensive defenseman who was one of the biggest players of his era, at 6'4" and 210 pounds.
He was not fearsome, but yes, he was very big, and a very good player. He was in my top-5 for available d-men.

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10-16-2011, 11:40 PM
  #337
BillyShoe1721
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Fonteyne was a penalty killer on THREE Stanley Cup Finals runs. He is by no means a goal scorer and if you are thinking of judging or comparing Fonteyne or Pellerin by their offense you're barking up the wrong tree: a defensive forward ought not to be judged by offensive stats. Fonteyne was tied for 4th in Detroit playoff scoring (with Labine and Pronovost) in their 1961 Cup run with 5 points in 11 games, but his scoring is beside the point, his defense isn't.
Why is scoring "beside the point"? If a guy has an adjusted PPG of .4608, I certainly would call that relevant. Just because he's playing in the bottom 6 doesn't mean that it's completely irrelevant. For some perspective, let's look at the controversial offensive dynamo from the MLD, Jan Erixon. His adjusted PPG was .32, better than Fonteyne's. Would you believe me if I said Pellerin actually once led his team in points? It's true. In what you call a journeyman season, he actually led the Wild in points with 39. The Wild were the 6th worst team in the NHL though and were last in goals for. He was also 4th in scoring in St. Louis in 98-99 among forwards, despite getting 29 seconds per game of PP time(9th among forwards with a mostly full season).

Quote:
Fonteyne and Pellerin don't belong in the same zip code. Fonteyne is arguably a MLD 4th liner this year whereas Pellerin is no better than Double-A Bottom-6 forwards, as we shall see.
You're entitled to your opinion.

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Old
10-17-2011, 12:19 AM
  #338
seventieslord
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Yeah, I gotta say I'm pretty perplexed about Pellerin right now. VI is right that he was a fringe player for much of his career, with the time spent in the AHL as direct evidence. On the other hand he did manage, for at least one season, to generate enough hype to get some significant selke recognition. He was also, for three seasons, the third-most important member of what was the best PK unit over that span.

If you're one who just counts accomplishments on a little checklist and throws out the rest (similar to saying someone is better offensively because they have a top-10 season and the other doesn't, even if all the other evidence points the other way) then it could be said that Pellerin is better. There is little evidence to suggest Fonteyne peaked like Pellerin appeared to peak that one season. (he may have, but how do we prove it? selke voting at least provides an objective template as a starting point for discussion) And certainly his teams were nothing special when he was their top PK forward (he was also past his prime by then)

However, if you look at total careers, value delivered by the player, accomplishment points comiled, however you want to say it, I think Fonteyne is the clear winner. Pellerin was a bonafide NHLer for just six seasons: 1998-2003, the only six years he didn't spend some time in the AHL. During this time he had two outlier seasons (just pointing out that they were outliers, not taking away from them) where he was a 17-minute player; and in one of them - 1999 - he was more than just a bit part, contributing to an 87-point team as their top PK forward, with the 2nd-best PK in the league, and led the league in SHG. He was rewarded with what appears to be a richly-deserved 9th-place selke voting finish. Good for him! However, it's downhill from there, big time. His other highlights are a year as a 17-minute player with a mediocre, offense-starved Minnesota squad, and 2000, when he was still with the Blues, playing likely the same PK specialist role but with duties scaled back across the board, sliding to just under 15 minutes. His 1998 was decent And then two seasons as a really run-of-the-mill 3rd/4th liner. In his next-best six seasons, for a total of twelve, he was a classic "tweener" - an excellent AHL player, and mediocre/flawed/fringe NHL player. He no doubt benefited from the NHL's dead puck era as the NHL expanding made it possible for him to keep a full-time job up there, and the focus on defensive players didn't hurt, either.

Of course, Fonteyne benefited from the NHL literally doubling in size when he was 33. Looking at his career line, you really can see what the league size versus talent pool meant to a guy like him. For six seasons, when only about 70 forwards could be full-time NHLers, he was just that. In the 1966 and 1967 seasons, he began his inevitable decline and started down the path to tweenerism, playing 87 NHL games, but also 29 in the AHL. However, he was just the type of guy that was assured of a full-time NHL job when the league expanded and that's just what he got, for five more full AHL-less seasons, before joining the WHA, likely because that was the best league that would take him at the time.

If Fonteyne was just a "tweener" during the AHL level, meaning he wasn't quite one of those 70 best forwards but was on the fringe, this would probably be a slam dunk victory for him. But he wasn't just a tweener, he was a full-time player, both when the NHL had only 6 teams, and when it had only 12. If you do some extrapolating and assume that talent pools doubled between his time and Pellerin's, you can make an educated guess as to who had the more "impressive" career. We know that with 12 (the modern equivalent of 6) teams, Fonteyne would be an NHL player in the 2000 era. Would Pellerin have had a job if the league was just 12 teams at that time? His performance in the 1999 season notwithstanding, the answer is almost certainly no.

It would take more of a microanalysis to really determine what Fonteyne's best seasons were, but the point of what I am trying to say is this:

player Fonteyne Pellerin Advantage?
best season solid O6 NHL PK forward 1999, 17 min, good pk, SHG, selke votes Pellerin
2nd-best solid O6 NHL PK forward 2000, lesser role for 1st overall team Fonteyne
3rd-best solid O6 NHL PK forward 2001, bad team scorer and 17 min player Fonteyne
4th-6th best solid O6 NHL PK forward 1998, 2003, 2004, decent 3rd/4th liner with 30 teams Fonteyne
7th-12th best decent post-expansion NHL PK forward 108 NHL games, 308 in the AHL Fonteyne

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10-17-2011, 12:33 AM
  #339
VanIslander
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Nicely put.

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10-17-2011, 12:48 AM
  #340
BillyShoe1721
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Fair enough. Never thought I'd see that in depth of a discussion over a 3rd line winger in the AAA Draft.

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Old
10-17-2011, 01:37 AM
  #341
seventieslord
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speaking of lasting a long time at the highest level when there are very few spots available, I'm pleased to introduce my #5 defenseman and a brand new, never-taken-before player.

I was taking a look at who had the most NHL GP circa 1970, among available players. With 414 career games, he is 10th on the list, but 1st among all defensemen. However, he played back when seasons were 48 games long. Adjusted to the usual 70-game season that the O6 players played, it would be about 604 games, 5th among available players and 1st among defensemen by a margin of 58% over the next guy (who is an O6 player so it's apples to apples).

For a more direct comparison, look at a cutoff of 1950, six years after the end of his career. You have to go all the way down to a guy with 307 GP as of 1950, before you find an available defenseman with more small-league NHL experience in this era.

This alone means he is worthy of our respect, having been an NHL defenseman for 8 full seasons when very few could be, and two more injury-shortened years. For ten straight years, when all the best players in the world were in the NHL and between 27 and 41 defensemen could be full-time NHLers, he was one of them, with no games played in the minors in that time, indicating he was not a fringe guy, either.

Also, he received one all-star vote in three separate seasons (once a 1st team vote). It's just one vote and it's impossible to know if it was a homer vote, but at least someone thought he was somewhat special - in other words, this is not just pick for GP purposes.

His name is Art Wiebe, D, a lifetime Chicago Blackhawk. Wiebe had just 41 career NHL points and was not an offensive threat. Clearly his value was playing defense. He won a cup in 1938 with Chicago and was average-sized for a 1930s defenseman; 5'10", 180 lbs.



For more evidence that Wiebe was far from nondescript, he was named the top defenseman in the AHA before joining the NHL full-time, despite having just two points. The AHA was the top minor league at the time, containing a large number of players on their way up to, or down from, the NHL.

- 5'10", 180 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1938)
- 10-season NHL regular, most pre-expansion GP among available D-men
- received one all-star vote in three separate seasons.
- Top AHA Defenseman (1934)


Last edited by seventieslord: 10-30-2011 at 03:58 AM.
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10-17-2011, 01:37 AM
  #342
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
Fair enough. Never thought I'd see that in depth of a discussion over a 3rd line winger in the AAA Draft.
That's what we live for

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10-17-2011, 11:50 AM
  #343
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With our pick from yesterday, the Indians select Bep Guidolin, LW

He's the highest scoring pre-expansion winger left, has a top 10 finish in points, and was apparently a rough player.

World War 2:
  • Joined the league in 1942-43 as a war replacement for the Bruins
  • The youngest player (16 years, 11 months) to play in an NHL game, on November 12, 1942.
  • Missed 1944-45 himself due to the war
Offense:
  • 9th in points and 4th in assists in 1949-50
  • 278 points (490 adjusted points) in 519 career games
Grit:
  • Finished 2nd, 2nd, and 7th in PIMs
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Guidolin played on a line with 17 year old Don Gallinger and 20 year old Bill Shill. With the famed "Kraut Line" of Milt Schmidt, Woody Dumart and Bobby Bauer absent from the Bruins line up due to war commitments, the Boston press was quick to dub the rookie line as the "Sprout Line."
Quote:
Originally Posted by legends of hockey
In 1945, Guidolin picked up where he left off this time against stronger lineups across the league. But his 175-pounds of raw muscle was up to the task. He continued to score at a respectable pace for two more seasons with the Bruins before trades took him to Detroit and on the his final NHL stop in Chicago.

With the Blackhawks, Guidolin put up his best single-season numbers, netting 17 goals and 34 assist. But his ardent support for the formation of a player's union brought on an early demise to his tenure in the NHL.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 10-17-2011 at 12:07 PM.
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10-17-2011, 12:00 PM
  #344
DaveG
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HC Davos selects G Ken Wregget



Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Wregget, who was born in the goaltending factory of Brandon, Manitoba and was a graduate of the Lethbridge Hurricanes junior program, broke into the NHL with the Toronto Maple Leafs in the mid 1980s. Those Leafs teams were particularly, ummm, well awful, really. But there were some high hopes mixed with inconsistency when Wregget and fellow young netminder Allan Bester arrived on the scene. On some nights they were spectacular, on other nights they were hung out to dry.

Perhaps Wregget's very first NHL game sums up his 6 years with the Leafs perfectly. In a game against Hartford in the 1983-84 season, Wregget made 48 saves to get the win! Spectacular right? Not bad at all, but he did let in 6 goals. Fortunately on this night Toronto was able to score 8, but more often than not the Leafs were not able to support either Wregget or Bester with enough goal support.

Bester eventually won the goalie battle in Toronto as Wregget was traded to Philadelphia for two first round picks that the Leafs used to select Rob Pearson and Steve Bancroft. Neither of those two prospects ever flourished, while Wregget provided steady netminding for the Flyers for much of the next three seasons.

Wregget was part of a blockbuster trade in February 1992, as he, Rick Tocchet and Kjell Samuelsson went to Pittsburgh in exchange for Mark Recchi, Brian Benning and a first round draft pick. Wregget would find his best success in Pittsburgh, backing up but often pushing starting goaltender Tom Barrasso. Wregget enjoyed his only Stanley Cup championship in 1992. By the lockout shortened season in 1995 he emerged as the top goalie, leading the league with 25 wins.

Barrasso would eventually wrestle his starter title back and by 1998 Wregget was on the way out of Pittsburgh. He briefly played in Calgary and Detroit, before hanging up the pads in 2001.

In 575 NHL contests Ken Wregget posted a record of 225-248-53 with 9 shutouts, a career 3.63 GAA and .885 save percentage. Great numbers? No, not even for his time period. But he had a reputation as a solid goalie, particularly in the back up role.
Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times, May 19th, 1995
Goaltender Ken Wregget again came up big in a Game 7 in Pittsburgh, stopping all 33 Washington shots as the Penguins completed a comeback from a 3-games-to-1 series deficit to oust the Capitals, 3-0, tonight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Jan 21st, 1995
Of all the reasons the Peguins are perched on top of the Northeast Division this morning, none is bigger then the play of Wregget.

"Kenny was the key" Jagr said.
Regular Season Numbers:
575GP 225-248-53, 3.63GAA, .885%, 9SOs

Post-Season Numbers:
56GP 28-25, 2.87GAA, .911%, 3SOs

3 times top 10 in wins (6, 8, 1)
4 times top 10 in shots against (4, 3, 4, 4) and saves (4, 5, 4, 4)

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10-17-2011, 12:00 PM
  #345
Rob Scuderi
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Coach Mike Buckna



IIHF HoF
BC Sports HoF
Czech Hockey HoF

Silver in '48 Olympics
Gold in '47 WC



Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliteprospects
Natural born coach, great player and kind person. Mike (Matej - as he was called in Czechoslovakia) Buckna was a son of Slovak parents, that emigrated to Canada. In Autumn 1935 he came to Czechoslovakia to see the country of his parents. He bound his career with LTC Praha (as a player-coach). First season he was playing with czechoslovak star Josef Malecek. In the three following seasons he was leading the second formation of LTC Praha. In 1938 he was appointed as a head coach of Czechoslovak national team. After winning bronze medal in 1938 he said, that he have team of good men, that want to battle for their coutry and that he is proud of them. After WC in 1939, his work was interrupted by WW2. After it, in 1946 he answered the call from Czechoslovakia to come back from Canada and coach national team once again. He led Czechoslovakia to gold medals in 1947 and to silver medals on Olympic games in 1948. In February 1948 his work for national team was interrupted once again. Communists made the coup d´état and in Czechoslovakia started the years of dire terror. Buckna came back to Canada. He was returning occasionaly to Czechoslovakia in 1970´ and 1980´. He died January 6, 1996 in Milwaukee, USA. (Jan Jech)
http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=78755

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail Historical Society
In 1946, the family returned to Prague where Mike was given the opportunity to coach the Czechoslovakian National Hockey team and was the coordinator of the entire Czech hockey system. He taught the kind of hockey played in Trail - conditioning and passing. He pioneered hockey clinics, coached senior and junior teams and started minor hockey for several thousand youngsters throughout the country. The result: a world hockey power.

Mike coached the Czech Olympic Team in the 1948 Olympics. The team only lost one game in those Olympics and that was to Canada. Mike's team won a silver medal. He also led the Czech National Team to three European titles and one world championship, in 1947. Shortly after the Olympics, the Russians occupied Czechoslovakia and Mike and his family had to return to Trail. He regained employment with Cominco and continued to play hockey for the Trail Smoke Eaters.

After his retirement from playing, Mike coached the Rossland Warriors and the Trail Junior Smoke Eaters. Mike was actively involved with hockey, both in Trail and Czechoslovakia, for almost fifty years.

In 1978, as the guest of the Czechoslovakian Hockey Federation, Mike was introduced as the "Father of Czechoslovakian Hockey."

In 1989, Mike received a major honour in his life. He was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame.
http://www.trailhistory.com/monument...n=display&id=8

Quote:
At a time when the rest of European hockey stressed defense, LTC’s offensive orientated style stood out in stark contrast, influencing both Team Moscow Head Coach Arkady Chernyshev and Player-Coach Anatoli Tarasov. This style would have an impact on the future direction of the so-called 'Soviet hockey system.' The Czech’s play had been the creation of Mike Buckna from Trail, British Columbia. Buckna, while visiting Prague in 1935, decided to offer his services as a player/coach to the Prague LTC club. At the time, LTC had already established itself as one of the top club teams in Europe and had gained respect in 1934 in Canada with its 1-0 win over the World Champion Saskatoon Quakers, in 1934. At the age of 21, the former Trail Smoke Eater had become one of the top players on the Prague club.

Czechoslovakian hockey was traditionally a very defensive style with defensemen rarely touching the puck in the offensive end and with the forwards dropping back to cover the net. Even with LTC’s achievements Buckna believed the defensive coaching philosophy adopted by the Czechoslovakians was stale and limiting the development and success of their hockey

Buckna saw hockey as a game built on the offensive fundamentals of passing, puck-handling, and forechecking. By the end of his first season in Prague, Buckna had already begun holding coaching clinics. The following year, at the age of 22, he was invited to run the Czechoslovakian National Team program. Buckna would stay in Prague until 1939 departing only when all Canadian coaches and players were evacuated just ahead of the Nazi annexation.

Years after the war, Buckna would return to Czechoslovakia where he would rebuild the nucleus of a great team utilizing former juniors he had coached before the war. In 1947, he led the Czech’s to their first World Championship and in 1948 he coached Czechoslovakia to the silver medal at the Winter Olympics. After the Olympic Games, Buckna returned home to Canada leaving a team and a system built largely on his techniques and philosophy.

It would be the Buckna concepts used in Czechoslovakia which the Russians would draw upon to create their own offensive orientated system. It was Buckna’s theories on how the game should be played, evident in the success of his Czechoslovakian team, which largely shaped what would eventually become the European style of hockey...

Tarasov’s critical opinion of other countries reliance on Canadian hockey specialists is ironic given the realization that his so-called 'Soviet hockey system' was not the invention of Tarasov, nor any other Russian. Rather, it had been largely copied from Buckna and a Toronto-based Canadian sports exercise and sports conditioning expert, Lloyd Percival.
http://boxscorenews.com/red-storm-ru...ey-p559-68.htm

Another somewhat clunky translation so I apologize. This link is in Czech originally and is dedicated to the LTC club but it's the only mention of his defensive coaching abilities I've found thus far.

Quote:
This excellent player and later coach of the LTC and the representation of Czechoslovakia had real name Mike Buckna, but for his Slovak origin, he said Matej Buckna.

In his native country came so that it responded to an advertisement that you could actually LTC and the Czechoslovak team in the Canadian newspaper. The country went third-class and because he had no ticket, had it right on the boat to work. Once arrived in Prague, demonstrated what it can and has been accepted without hesitation. He discovered a lot of hockey for our talents, is also called the Father of Czechoslovak hockey.

Since joining LTC in the season 1935-1936 he worked at the club and representation to the beginning of the war. After the meeting with the defender into his old home back. Coached and played in LTC as well as in representation. He won for us the first world title. In our hockey brought new elements of training, games, players learned to defend the great personalities, but also a friend to players who have it fully respected.

At the end of his work in LTC and representation came into conflict with Vladimir Zábrodský. He was coach of world champions in 1947, with further success two years later, not because they emigrated abroad.
http://www.ltcpraha.ic.cz/treneri-fu...ce=profil&id=4


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 10-18-2011 at 02:29 PM.
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10-17-2011, 12:01 PM
  #346
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Coach Terry Murray



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10-17-2011, 12:14 PM
  #347
tony d
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Garnish selects Right Winger JP Dumont, a move in which I think qualifies Garnish for the playoffs.



Some stats on Dumont:

- 523 Points in 822 Career Games
- 3 Seasons of 40 or more Assists
- 1 Top 10 Finish in Game Winning Goals (2006-2007 #6 for the season)

For more on Dumont, click the following link:

http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=11671


Last edited by tony d: 10-22-2011 at 12:48 PM.
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10-17-2011, 12:37 PM
  #348
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Springfield Indians select Bill Hicke, RW
  • Scored 45, 51, 39 points with the Montreal Canadiens prior to expansion, while seeing limited ice time.
  • Suffer non-hockey related health problems in the middle of his career.
  • Came back to have several good seasons with the Seals post-expansion.
  • 2nd leading goal scorer in Seals history.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
Bill Hicke was a compact, fleet-footed skater who, as a junior with the Regina Pats, could put the puck in the net in a big way
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadiens Official History Site
Named 1958-59’s Rookie of the Year, Hicke captured the league scoring title and split AHL MVP honors with teammate, Rudy Migay. He also had his name engraved on the Stanley Cup, the result of playing his first NHL game with the Canadiens that postseason.

Maurice Richard’s retirement cleared the way for Hicke to take a regular shift. Playing in every game on the Canadiens schedule for the next three seasons, he recorded 135 points on 55 goals and 80 assists, peaking with a 20-goal, 51-point effort in 1961-62.

A solid two-way player who put up more than respectable numbers and played a clean, skilled game, Hicke emerged as a competent, reliable performer but, like most players cursed with a “next big thing” label, was unable to fill the superstar-sized skates the fans had chosen for him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded - The Untold Story of the Seals
"A dynamic player, he could really score. He shot left-handed and played the right wing, one of the first off-wingers. He was very smart and knew when to break and how to finish. He had lots of charisma" - Ted Hampson

While Hicke never developed into the goalscorer Richard was, he became a respectable NHL wing, reaching the 20-goal mark in his third NHL season... In his first season in Oakland, Hicke led the team in goalscoring with 21 tallies. He was the club's only 20-goal scorer that year... Hicke had the respect of his teammates. Ron Harris called Hicke "one of our leaders on the ice. He was our goalscorer. It's too bad he got sick."

Gary Jarrett remembers his former linemate fondly. "He was a good player - one of the best offensive RWs I played with. He was robust and full of self-confidence and he was an aggressive skater. He had that fire in his eyes when he got in on the goalie from the blueline. He was a bit like Rocket Richard in that regard..."

He was known as a carefree person off the ice. It was a bit upsetting to him that the Seals "had practically no notoreity off the ice... his flamboyant style and carefree attitude did rub some of his teammates the wrong way, especially when his skills started to fade a bit. Doug Roberts remembered that "Hicke was highly skilled, but he didn't take care of himself. I thought he was playing out the string. He was not consistent, especially on the road. He had a lot of skill and we all looked up to him from his days with Montreal."

...Hicke became one of the first NHL players to develop a skin problem known informally as "gunk", that became an epidemic in the league by the mid-70s. Bert Marshall rememberd that Hicke "had a really bad case. It got so bad that he couldn't even practice."

Rookie Tracy Pratt said that Hicke was "an individualist who thought he was a prolific goalscorer." But even Pratt admitted that Hicke "scored clutch goals and provided leadership."

Earl Ingarfield had this to say about Bill Hicke: "He is one of my best friends in hockey and a real character. He was a skilled player and a good person off the ice." For the expansion Seals, Hicke was their first real goalscoring threat and their most colorful offensive player. He left his mark on the memories of hockey fans in the Bay Area.

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10-17-2011, 12:59 PM
  #349
seventieslord
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Regina selects a guy who I think is the ideal AAA (or MLD) 4 th liner – ”Pistol” Pete Horeck, LW. Horeck is, by my estimation, the third most offensively accomplished pre-expansion NHL winger out there, and the two ahead of him aren’t far ahead, nor are they cut out for bottom-six duty. From 1945 to 1949, he achieved his five best percentage scores; 79, 49, 48, 45, and 40, placing 10th, 23rd, 28th, 29th and 33rd in scoring. He was described as a very tough and physical player, and a lot of game reports I read in research for other players mentioned him getting into scraps and altercations with others.

Players describes him as the Mike Peca of his day, for his open-ice hitting ability, though his defensive ability to fulfill that comparison is unknown at this time. Horeck’s playoff resume includes no Stanley cups but he did get to the finals twice, in 1948 and 1949 with Detroit, leading the 1948 playoffs with 7 assists. Also notable was his massive collision with Vezina winner Al Rollins when Rollins left his crease to get to a loose puck before Horeck could retrieve it for a breakaway. It knocked Rollins out, leaving the Leafs with an aging Broda to tend the nets. They were no worse off; however, finishing off Horeck’s Bruins in 6 games and winning yet another cup.

LW Pete Horeck



- 5'9", 158 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1948, 1949)
- 9th in goals (1946) - top-20 one more time
- 9th in assists (1946)
- 10th in points (1946)
- 6th in playoff goals, 1st in assists, 3rd in points (1948) - Led all Wings including Howe, Lindsay, Abel, Kelly!
- 224 points in 446 games
- 14 points in 34 playoff games

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Pete Horeck enjoyed a 426-game NHL career over eight seasons, beginning in 1944-45 as a member of the Chicago Blackhawks, who claimed him from Cleveland in the 1944 Intra League Draft. It became evident Horeck had a knack for scoring, netting 20 goals in each of his first two seasons with the Blackhawks. He had drawn the attention of the Detroit Red Wings, who acquired him in a trade with Leo Reise for Adam Brown and Ray Powell in December, 1946.

After three seasons in the Motor City, Horeck was traded to the Boston Bruins in a multi-player deal in the summer of 1949. He played two years there before finishing out his NHL career back where it all began in Chicago.

Although Horeck played on a Detroit team that advanced to the Stanley Cup finals in both 1948 and 1949, he never played on a championship winner, losing both years to the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Every Player Who Has Ever played In the NHL
The Michael Peca of his day, Pete Horeck packed a ton of meanness and physical punishment into his 158-pound frame… established a reputation as a ferocious checker who was both fearless and reckless… he became a fan favourite, the little guy who could…in the first round of the 1951 playoffs he had his most controversial moment, racing after a loose puck he collided with Al Rollins, who was lost for the series with ligament damage


Last edited by seventieslord: 10-30-2011 at 04:13 AM.
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Old
10-17-2011, 01:12 PM
  #350
seventieslord
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Heh, Guidolin was one of the two I was referring to. He averaged the same PPG as Horeck at the same time, but over 97 more games. I apparently stand corrected though, as I was not aware of his high PIMs. I assume there is anecdotal evidence of the grit too?

And actually I found one more guy with a better offensive record, making Horeck 3rd at the time of selection (since Guidolin was taken just before)

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